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Split Pickup Signal Two Ways


Devon8822
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I am wondering if it is possible to use a dpdt switch or something to split a guitar signal two ways depending on the switch's position. For example... position one send 2 pickup signals right to different output jacks (keeping the signals split), and than position two send both pickups signals to a pickup selector switch.

I want to do this so I can change pickups via footswitch, but than there are time when I need to use another rig, and I would like to be able to switch pickups from my guitar.

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I'm working on a two channel setup and after some complicated diagrams I came up with this simple one, meant for a guitar with two pickups.

DualOutputGuitar.gif

If only one of the guitar outputs (doesn't matter which one) is used, as with a normal guitar, the output swap switch works as a pickup selector.

If both outputs are used (I'm gonna use a twin cable with 2 TS plugs at both ends), the output swap switch provides a choice which pickup signal goes to which output channel. At the other side of the twin cable, additional foot controlled switching is possible, though I don't think I'm gonna need it.

The parallel On/Off switch overrides any setting of the swap switch : pickup signals are combined into one signal which is sent to both channels. And the pickup volume pots influence each other like in a contemporary Les Paul.

Two separate output jacks in one guitar might be a bridge too far (when routing or drilling is not an option). It's possible to use one stereo jack instead, but it's troublesome using a mono cable with TS plugs then, because with the parallel switch to "On", the signal will be shorted to ground. Unless you want the parallel switch to double as a kill switch. Or you can also leave the parallel switch out if you're not interested in that pickup combination. Otherwise a stereo cable with TRS plug should be used, which can be seen as an extention of the internal guitar wiring, ending with two separate output TS jacks again. See diagram below.

You might wanna try this idea - if eventually you don't like it won't have cost much work and money.

Lucas

Edited by lvs
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... another one I dug up, maybe closer to what you want.

DualOutputGuitar2.gif

With the DPDT switch at position 1, one guitar output is assigned to the neck pickup, the other output to the bridge pickup and the pickup selector is killed by shorting it.

With the DPDT switch at position 2, the pickup selector works normally and it's output goes to both jacks.

Lucas

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... and another one derived from the previous, which allows both a TRS and TS plug.

DualOutputGuitar3.gif

With the DPDT switch at position 1, the ring output is assigned to the neck pickup, the tip to the bridge pickup and the pickup selector is killed by shorting it.

Normally a TRS plug is inserted. With a TS plug there will be sound, but only from the bridge pickup since the ring connection becomes grounded.

With the DPDT switch at position 2, the pickup selector works normally and it's signal goes to the tip output, while the ring is connected to ground.

Normally a TS plug is inserted but a stereo cable with TRS plugs will work of course too with a mono rig. But if the latter is running to a dual channel rig, the channel connected to the ring will be silent, but won't at least be humming, thanks to the ring connection grounded from inside the guitar.

The point is, even at an accidental wrong position of the DPDT switch, there won't be embarrassing silence, and there won't be annoying hum. In my humble opinion, in the absence of cable sensing, a reasonable compromise.

By the way, the Les Paul type selector can be also be a 3-way blade switch like for Tele.

Lucas

Edited by lvs
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I got here late, and am not sure the OP is still watching, but splitting a signal with a DPDT switch is pretty simple, as long as you know the place in the signal you want to do it. It sounds like you need it to go right before your pickup selector switch. I believe the simplest way to do it is as follows:

DoubleOut.gif

A more elegant solution, however, would be to avoid the DPDT switch altogether and used something called an "open circuit" stereo jack. The way it would work is when you plug in whatever cord you're running to your pickup selector pedal, it would automatically cut off the output to the other path, and when you unplugged it, the output to the other path would resume. It's like when you plug your headphones into a radio and the radio's speakers shut off. I'd diagram it, but different switches work differently. Anyway, that's what I'd do. It's more idiot proof in a live performance (a good thing), and avoids the extra switch on the face of your guitar.

David

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  • 6 months later...

[please note the following is meant to be informative and not condescending ] they make these wonderful things called switching jacks that allow you to do all this with some simple wiring and a stereo cable. plug in standard guitar cable and you get standard wiring plug in a stereo cable and you get both pickups split. My brian moore midi guitar had one of these in it crazy amount of pins on it and heck of a time finding replacement [that is till i said screw it and wired it how i saw fit. then of course my buddy finds them] but it may not be worth the hassle unless you have a route that can handle it.

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