Jump to content

Voting for August 2019's Guitar Of The Month is now open!
VOTE HERE

MetalOne72

Any Inlaying On A Radiused Fingerboard Tutorials?

Recommended Posts

Anyone have any good links to Tutorials on Inlaying on a preradiused board? It seems like the experts like inlaying on a pre-radiused board, but I need to see it done to help me understand some things.

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There´s a pinned topic right here where you posted.

Edit: I don´t know if that´s exactly helpful to you but there´s this post by Setch.

Edited by MexicanBreed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just reread that topic too,and it is still interesting,but I can't see how anyone does the cavity cutting on those tiny inlays with a rotary tool without making a big mess...the dremel tends to want to slide away every time I try.I have honestly screwed up every single attempt with a Dremel...even with the little stewmac base..and you still have to chisel out the tiny corners.Very frustrating

On ScottR's advice I bought two sets of micro chisels (1.5mm and 2mm blades)and did my first successful inlay by hand.It did not take long at all and it is much easier to control.I am sure others are most likely much more sure handed,but for an inlay beginner(like me),I really recommend a good set of microchisels.

You won't ever get the bottom of the cavity perfectly flat with them,but it really doesn't matter since you most likely will be gluing the inlays in with Epoxy or thick CA...I used epoxy and then after that cured I wicked in medium CA around the edges to catch any voids around the edges

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read that pinned topic several times, but I was curious if there was any tutorials out there showing someone going through the motions from start to finished. I was thinking of picking up Larry Robinson's videos but the $140 is pricey and I'm not sure what is actually shown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read that pinned topic several times, but I was curious if there was any tutorials out there showing someone going through the motions from start to finished. I was thinking of picking up Larry Robinson's videos but the $140 is pricey and I'm not sure what is actually shown.

First I have the Larry Robinson videos but they do not show someone getting inlay ton to a pre-radiused guitar neck. If you want to learn how to inlay then the video will be a help. The only difference inlaying into a pre-radiused board and a radiused board is the radius. To eliminate the radius had two pieces of wood to each side of the neck and a larger dremel base to span across the board. This way your dremel is always flat. It will take a bit of work to work out setting up the wood on each side. If you leave in the frets it will be even harder. Almost impossible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Wes, I would use the dremel to rough out the inside of a design.Then cut it in with a sharp tool,by hand.You can do it the way woodenspoke has said, or get two pieces of radiused wood to clamp on top of the board and use that to guide your tool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so even though the FB is radiused, you still route a flat bottom that is parallel to the bottom of the finger board. So when you cut the pearl do you cut the pearl at any angle or iare all the cuts still done at perpindicular to the bottom of the pearl?

So what good are the Robinson video's?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disregard the radius. It doesnt really matter if the bottom of the cavity is radiused for inlay work that is small. Block inlays, just run off the centreline, and dont tilt it to follow the radius (as best you can). Ive never used the method with two pieces of wood either side, that to me is just too difficult.

Use epoxy to glue in the inlay, and any radius to the bottom of the cavity will be filled. Tint the exopy to suit.

This is the best I can do for you right now, it's a preradiused board, as are most of my inlay jobs:

Wes, use a 3/64 or larger to remove the bulk. Get close to the line. Switch to 1/32, and cut in a clockwise direction for internal routing (run the opposite way to normal, so the bit tries to "run"). You'll notice the cutter doesn't "bite" but rather it runs alone the edges, removing very little each time. This I find is much much easier to control. Rout the full depth of the inlay piece in one go. Use just under half speed, it will break less bits.

Always cut the pearl perdendicular. If you have multiple pieces joining each other, then fine tune their joints with a file, angling if need be. It would have to be a wide inlay to bother with that though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok that helps. Though I would be interested in something with a larger inlay, but pretty cool none the less. My guess is that was a pretty flat radius? Also,How did you scribe the shape onto the Fingerboard with the radius? Was it done by rolling the inlay on the Fingerboardand tracing it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok that helps. Though I would be interested in something with a larger inlay, but pretty cool none the less. My guess is that was a pretty flat radius? Also,How did you scribe the shape onto the Fingerboard with the radius? Was it done by rolling the inlay on the Fingerboardand tracing it?

yes. note the paint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disregard the radius. It doesnt really matter if the bottom of the cavity is radiused for inlay work that is small. Block inlays, just run off the centreline, and dont tilt it to follow the radius (as best you can). Ive never used the method with two pieces of wood either side, that to me is just too difficult.

Use epoxy to glue in the inlay, and any radius to the bottom of the cavity will be filled. Tint the exopy to suit.

Wes, use a 3/64 or larger to remove the bulk. Get close to the line. Switch to 1/32, and cut in a clockwise direction for internal routing (run the opposite way to normal, so the bit tries to "run"). You'll notice the cutter doesn't "bite" but rather it runs alone the edges, removing very little each time. This I find is much much easier to control. Rout the full depth of the inlay piece in one go. Use just under half speed, it will break less bits.

Always cut the pearl perdendicular. If you have multiple pieces joining each other, then fine tune their joints with a file, angling if need be. It would have to be a wide inlay to bother with that though.

+1

That's how I do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the best I can do for you right now, it's a preradiused board, as are most of my inlay jobs:

Perry, what sort of blade are you using to cut the pearl in that video? Just tried cutting my first inlay and the blade kept getting caught on the upstroke and I ended up snapping my inlay multiple times. Ended up shaping it with my dremel instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...