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Giannini repair pictures Before and After...


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It's less boomy and more articulate... I would be willing to bet the owner will feel it sounds better now than it did new! It sustains amazingly well for a nylon stringed guitar, too! I have a sound clip thread on it here somewhere...

Thanks for the comments, too! What you described, Maiden69, was precisely what I was trying to achieve! You just made my day! :D Boggs

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Of course not... Here's what I did besides de-divoting the fingerboard and installing the electronics...

I cut a geometric hole where it was worn through and cut a piece of 1/32 aircraft plywood (real high quality stuff) to make a patch. I built up and repaired the bracing and expoxed the cross brace for the patch to bond to and filled the hole. I then shaved and scraped the worst area of laminate destruction from wear and body sweat rot from the top about 1/32 inch deep (the top is only .100 thick) and traced the edges. I used that tracing to make another patch from the 1/32 material and filled the shaved out area with it and filled the edge with wood filler. I then sanded the top smooth.

I had some nice walnut veneer so I designed a pickguard using it and cut out the shape to cover the patched area and bonded it to some 1/64th aircraft plywood. I used a strong double-back tape on the body of the guard and glue around the edges along with a wood fill around the edges to seal it down. It should be a LOT more robust than that cheap laminate that Giannini uses for their tops. I then sealed the guitar with a spar urethane (5 coats) since this guitar sees bad weather and sweat and serious abuse. Oh yeah... I also repaired where the back was delaminating and separating from the side... Boggs

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