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Anybody Used The Grizzly Spokeshaves?


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Grizzly has spokeshaves for about half the price of the Stanley ones at Woodcraft and they look pretty similar. (I wonder if they're made in the same Asian factory?) Are the Grizzly ones any good? I know you can spend a lot of cash on a top of the line one, but I just need something pretty basic to do a few necks. Thanks!
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I wouldn't spend any more money on the Stanley ones than any other cheaper spokeshaves, but if I was going for a quality one I would spend the money on a Lie Nielsen or Clifton. In my experience, the new Stanley tools aren't much better at what they do than the cheaper imported ones, the blades aren't great, the spokeshave cap iron gets shavings caught under it instead of acting as a chip breaker, and the beds aren't that flat. You can soup up cheap spokeshaves though; stick in a thicker replacement blade, make a new chipbreaker out of 1/4" thick brass and file the bed flat and you'll get a fantastic tool.

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but I just need something pretty basic to do a few necks. Thanks!

How about this?. I used spokeshaves for my first few necks and I loved the feel once the spokeshave was set up properly. However, in the time it takes to tune up a spokeshave, you could have carved several necks with a microplane. Those in the link are a 8" - I use a 12" double handled one for neck carving. I still like the spokeshaves but love the microplanes.

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I was told by an avid woodworker and part time salesman at Woodcraft that he found the Veritas plane to be excellent. It adjust for both convex and convex surfaces and runs about $50. Lie Neilsen has beautiful stuff, but command quite a few bucks ( not that they're not worth it!).

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but I just need something pretty basic to do a few necks. Thanks!

How about this?. I used spokeshaves for my first few necks and I loved the feel once the spokeshave was set up properly. However, in the time it takes to tune up a spokeshave, you could have carved several necks with a microplane. Those in the link are a 8" - I use a 12" double handled one for neck carving. I still like the spokeshaves but love the microplanes.

I'm gonna check these out! Thanks!

Edited by fyb
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Forget microplanes. I have one, but since I got my hand-cut rasps (mine are from Dick in Germany, others such as Ariou or StewMac's Dargon rasps are probably equivalent), I've never bothered using it.

I can rough out a neck in under 10 minutes with nothing more than my pair of rasps (medium and fine-ish) and a shinto hacksaw rasp thing for coarse stock removal. I mean, I love a sharp edged tool, have plenty of planes, will certainly get more planes in the future, but for necks, it's rasps and finishing with sanding blocks, belts and (most importantly) a scraper for me. Maybe I'll get a decent spokeshave one day, but I doubt it'll make me work faster or more accurately.

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One of the woodwoorking mags did a spokeshave shootout earlier this year. I'll dig up the issue when I get home and post what they said. The issue is in my backpack, but I left it at home today.

OK, The Taunton/Fine Woodworking tool guide reviewed several regular and low angle Spokeshaves. Kunz rated the best value @ $20 ($19.99 at Woodcraft) with a minor tuneup.

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