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Time To Drill? Time To Paint?


gosh
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Hi guys.

On my LP project, I am getting closer to having the body shaped.

http://59gibsonlespaul.blogspot.com/

My question is: Do I drill holes for knobs, bridge etc before or after painting and clear coats?

I guess either would work if the drill bits are sharp enough to do it after or I drill them first and mask the holes but I'd like your advice on what YOU do to get the sequence right.

Also, I have to start thinking about the finish and although Stew Mac have all the right stuff to make a 59 LP replica, they don't ship overseas.

So my second question is: Where can i purchase grain filler, colour paint for the flame and the final laquer?? (top coats) in the UK? Or is there another way?

Just trying to get ahead so the build goes smoothly.

Many thanks, Paul

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Drill before you paint, doing it afterwards just begs for a disaster.

As for paint there's a myriad of places over here just depends on:

1)...how you're going to paint - brush, spray can or spray gun ?

2)...what you want to use - cellulose, 2pack acrylic, 2pack poly, anything you can get your hands on ?

There's a pinned post EU suppliers which lists all the usual suspects plus don't forget your local paint factors.

Jem

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Drill before you paint, doing it afterwards just begs for a disaster.

As for paint there's a myriad of places over here just depends on:

1)...how you're going to paint - brush, spray can or spray gun ?

2)...what you want to use - cellulose, 2pack acrylic, 2pack poly, anything you can get your hands on ?

There's a pinned post EU suppliers which lists all the usual suspects plus don't forget your local paint factors.

Jem

OK. I drill before painting. Thanks mate.

1. I'm using a professional air compressor and spray gun. I have the gun, i'm borrowing the compressor.

2. Whatever is standard or you think is good for my replica. I want the finish to look like an aged LP without the crackling obviously but I'd like a very high gloss finish. Only thing I have found so far is a product by RUSTINS.CO.UK, which is like a 2 pack high gloss laquer. What I'd like really is a set of products that will allow me to prep the thing, paint the burst, let down or mix the paints to get the colours right and thin the laquer and ALL be compatible together if possible. I fear putting one thing on top of another and getting a reaction that will mean sanding back and starting over.

Thanks for the link to the suppliers. I'll check that and call a few of them.

I really have no experience in this area at all.

Thanks for your help

Edited by gosh
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Juts to muddy the waters, I usually drill afterwards. Either way works, and I like not having finish and polishing gunk ending up in the holes which will need clenaing out later... usually with a drill :D

LOL. But I appreciate the input.

I was hoping to get replies from guys who have built lots of guitars as opposed to this, my first in the hope that picking all of your collective brains would give me an average. I'm sure you all have differing techniques and that one or the other is fine, but in my heart I want to do this properly and ALL advice is appreciated.

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I've used the rustins hi-gloss 2-part UF resin lacquer for a couple of projects - mainly because it gives a great tough fast high gloss without the need for good spray equipment. In my view, it is not the right stuff to use if you are after recreating a burst paint job. For this NC lacquer is best if you have the spray gear and the patience (I have neither). The Rustins material will not be compatible with some colorants, you need to check carefully as if they are wrong it will not cure properly (ever).

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Juts to muddy the waters, I usually drill afterwards. Either way works, and I like not having finish and polishing gunk ending up in the holes which will need clenaing out later... usually with a drill :D

Touché :D I know where you're at with 'gunk' cleaning, i use bushing reamers rather than a drill but in the first place i'm just mindfull of scratching something hence drilling first and as you say, either way will work, it's just a hole after all.

On the original post: the 'traditional' medium would be cellulose and i suppose the most revered of that would be Behlen's Behlen's UK site although with nitro you do have the 'checking' issue but that's 20 years down the line. Me, nowadays i just use automotive cellulose (christ knows what the difference is) or 2pack acrylic automotive paint if i'm in a hurry and need a fast build with quick cure times.

Jem

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I spoke with the people at Rustins and they tell me all their products are compatible. Do you think mixing a dye with a weakened solution of the lacquer to create the aged, yellowed top and faded red burst finish would work before using the lacquer neat for the final top coats?

Here was my plan after grain filler:

1. apply a thin lacquer coat overall

2. apply a thinned lacquer, yellow coat to the top

3. apply a thinned laquer red burst

4 apply the top laquer overall

5. buff and finish

Sound OK?

Here's where I got my idea from:

http://www.setchellguitars.co.uk/ant/blog/?page_id=23

Edited by gosh
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