Jump to content

Wooden Inlays


Recommended Posts

Hey guys

Ive decided that the crown inlays on my LP are going to be wood. It's going to be a dark wood to match the bit that I have to stick on the headstock after finding a rotten bit.

I was just wondering if anyone had used wooden inlays before and if there is anything that may catch me out. It seems straight forward enough and that's whats worrying me.

Also sorry if some of you have seen this thread before. I think I've posted it a good while back but I can't seem to find it.

Cheers guys :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

T. Breeze Verdant

the man does some awesome stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've done a liitle bit marquetry before and its actually not quite the same as inlaying on a fretboard. With marquetry you cut all the way through wood and make little windows in which to piece together the picture. Inlaying means cutting a hole to certain depth (rather than going all the way through) which I found harder.

Two things to look out for when inlaying.

1 - The venner I was using was very thin so I was running the risk of sanding through when I radiused the board.

2 - I also had difficulties inlaying a piece of light wood in a dark freboard (ebony, rosewood, etc.) as when I sanded the board dark dust from the fretboard filled in the grain of the lighter wood and I couldn't get it out.

Overall I got some decent results but had to vary my technique to avoid the 2 problems above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't done a wood inlay on a fret board yet but have inlayed some marquetry.

Woody06cs.jpg

On a fret board I think you would want to use something a little thicker than veneer but I think it could be done with proper planning. Also, depending on what kind of wood you use you might need to seal the inlay to keep finger crud from working it's way in to the wood. More of an intarsia technique might be better but I have no idea what that would do to the stability of the board with the different woods moving with climate changes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wood inlay is the exact same thing as any other inlay, as long as your actually inlaying it. Marquetry is similar in that you cut out pieces and put them together like a puzzle.

If your inlaying woods I don't recommend anything less than than 1.5MM thick, or as thick as shell. That may be a little hard to get, or just thickness out your own materials. I recommend also sealing the woods with glue (liquid CA) on both sides to keep it from fraying out as you cut it. That and remember light woods on a fingerboard will collect dirt and debris, and fade out over time, Maple will also wear faster than ebony, etc.. so keep the hardnesses in mind. On a headstock or other no-wear surface do whatever you feel like!

Craig Lavin

(Clavin :o)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An added thought regarding colors- yes ebony in maple, or vice versa is a pain to work with as the maple inlay will get dark, or the ebony dust will fill the maple making it dark. You can clean it out, but it never really cleans out pure. Trying to sand it out just makes a depression around the inlay you rather not have to deal with. Sealing it will do you little good, as you'll sand away the sealer unless it penetrates fully, during the leveling process.

Craig Lavin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...