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scorpionscar

Four new rockers are coming to life

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scorpionscar    18

Today I've glued on the hardmapple top to the cedar-bubinga body and did an access in the inferior horn in the posterior zone for a better accesibility to the last frets. Some pics of the advances:

 

 

Do1.jpg

Do2.jpg

Do3.jpg

Do4.jpg

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scorpionscar    18
8 hours ago, bileshake said:

Really like the cutaways on the carved top. Nice and pronounced.

Thank you BILISHAKE I'm glad you like it. Yesterday and today I've been working on the flying-v body and is almos done. I made the bridge humbucker cavity, the cavity control, the neck pocket and the lateral carvings. I'm going to explain how I did the last ones: 

- For the neck pocke I used a double MDF template joined together wit screws. I used a 8 mm height piece of wood at a determinate distance for creating a 2º ramp. I used double side tape. Whe the bit couldn't go down, I unscrewed one of the templates and that way the bit is allowed to get deeper.

- For the lateral carvings I used a 12.7 mm radious bit with no bearing. I built a 3 piece jig, one acts as a base for the router, another one acts as a stopo block, and the third is 1.5 mm longer and acts as a rail to avoid that the router can desestabilize. In went down in increments of 3 milimeters. Some pics of the process:

 

fLY1.jpg

Fly2.jpg

Fly3.jpg

Fly4.jpg

Fly5.jpg

Fly6.jpg

Fly7.jpg

Fly8.jpg

Fly9.jpg

Fly10.jpg

Fly11.jpg

Fly12.jpg

Fly13.jpg

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pan_kara    151

nice, I'm liking the jig work. I somehow never thought of a double template setup for neck pockets, will have to remember this trick

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scorpionscar    18

It's very usefull PAN_KARA cause sometimes the router bits are too long or too short. With this method is possible to allow always the bearings in contact with the border of the template. Sometimes I used a 3 piece specially for pick up cavities. This way is no necessary to drill holes previously in order to empty the cavities.

Scorpionscar

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scorpionscar    18

Today I've spent five hours cutting the edges of the cameras and sanding the interior. It was tedious and no easy but the result well worth the effort. The easy thing would have been left the round edges of the bearing of the bit, but personally I think that in this guitar the personality and the essence are just the corners, so I did. I had to build a jig with two pletins of 3 mm to act as a guide for guiding the blade of the saw in order to respect the rectitude of the line. Some pics of the process:

 

Ala1.jpg

Ala2.jpg

Ala3.jpg

Ala4.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

Today I've been working on the fretslots. I used a homemade miter box made with recycling materials. I spent a lot of time setting up the jig but well worth the effort cause it works fantastic and is very precise. I cut the slots but not as deep as tang, after that, I use my japanesse saw with a stop block and is now when I locate the acrylic stop block the lenght of the tang plus six or seventh of a milimiter. This way is no necessary to fill the gap and it works great for me.

In one of the pictures there is the easter candle's of my grandma in honour to Curtisa Who tought me the trick of lubricating the saw blade with the parafin of the candle. At the same time I pray to god for no make mistakes at this stage of the process. Some pics of the advances:

 

D1.jpg

D2.jpg

D3.jpg

D4.jpg

D5.jpg

D6.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

inlays of one of the Strato figerboards done, simple, but effectives, sometimes in the simplicity is the hit, is no necessary to inovate too much. The inlays of the other Strato, and the Flying-v are more elaborated and eye-catching. The fingerboard of the carved guitar, has no inlays, is a complete ebony fingerboard, I slotted it today too. Some pics:

 

D7.jpg

D8.jpg

D9.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

What do you think is better for gluing the fingerboard (bolt on neck)?:

- First route the fingerboard with the same template used for the neck, and then glue or

- Glue it first, and then use the neck shape as a template?

All your advises will be wellcome.

Scorpionscar

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ScottR    1,365

Of those choices, I'd glue it first and use the neck as a template. This will eliminate any chance of mis-alignment and also route away any glue squeeze out...as long as you don't have so much it dries and gets in the way of the guide bearing.

I always glue them up and then cut them to shape at the same time.

SR

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pan_kara    151

I think my preferred order is different from either of the two - I cut the fingerboard to shape first, then glue it to the neck that is rough-cut and then use the fingerboard as a template to trim the neck. But that works since I do the radiusing after that (and fret slots before).

For a fingerboard that's already radiused that's more tricky since you lose the flat surface for the router (unless you go from the other side and that is still flat). There I'd probably do as Scott says - glue and then trim both. Or glue the fingerboard and trim it with the neck as a template.

I'd never cut both and try to glue later, in my case that's asking for disaster. Or at least I'd need to be very precise with avoiding a slip during glue-up which is something I always have problems with, and here you pretty much have zero margin for error.

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scorpionscar    18
21 hours ago, ScottR said:

Of those choices, I'd glue it first and use the neck as a template. This will eliminate any chance of mis-alignment and also route away any glue squeeze out...as long as you don't have so much it dries and gets in the way of the guide bearing.

I always glue them up and then cut them to shape at the same time.S

I've decided to do it this way ScottR. The fingerboard is already radiused but suppose there is no problem to rout it on the router table.

 

5 hours ago, pan_kara said:

I think my preferred order is different from either of the two - I cut the fingerboard to shape first, then glue it to the neck that is rough-cut and then use the fingerboard as a template to trim the neck. But that works since I do the radiusing after that (and fret slots before).

For a fingerboard that's already radiused that's more tricky since you lose the flat surface for the router (unless you go from the other side and that is still flat). There I'd probably do as Scott says - glue and then trim both. Or glue the fingerboard and trim it with the neck as a template.

I'd never cut both and try to glue later, in my case that's asking for disaster. Or at least I'd need to be very precise with avoiding a slip during glue-up which is something I always have problems with, and here you pretty much have zero margin for error.

You're right, is quite risky, because of don't have margin of error, I finally did it as ScottR said, but your method of using the fingerboard as a template seems to be interesting to. Thank you for your suggestions.

For gluing it the idea was to use two pins in order to avoid the displacement of the fingerboard due to the effects of the glue. I want to drill two holes with a 1mm diameter drill bit and them insert a nail of the same diameter but didn't found in any store, for that reason I decided to use the bit itself as a pin. The glue seems to be sucessfully. Some pics of the process:

 

Pin1.jpg

Pin2.jpg

Pin3.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

This is a jig I made for trimming the fingerboard using the neck shape as a template easily. It consists of two moveable cauls of MDF fixed to the bench with clamps. The router goes screwed on to a base. If the depth is not the correct, you can lay down the neck over a wood suplement of the measure you need: 

 

Di1.jpg

Di2.jpg

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