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Prostheta

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Prostheta last won the day on August 1

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About Prostheta

  • Birthday 07/18/1976

Retained

  • Member Title
    "Looks just like a Telefunken U-47"

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    Raisio, Suomi

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  1. I highly recommend having a few double-cut machinists files around the place! After you've sanded a corner like that, a few licks with a file smooth it out further than rough sandpaper does. It's partially endgrain so they become a pain to sand up without significant reshaping. That looks hella good though. Nice and square to the outline.
  2. My inspiration really was to take an instrument that is known for being jangly, clean and fantastic through a wet spring verb and do some monkeying to broaden what is possible. Nothing far from base, but enough to add something unique. Maybe a 7-string Jaguar that has the fit and finish of a 6-string? Shame that the Jaguar's stock tremolo doesn't look easily modifiable into a 7-string tremolo....having that, a locking nut and a roller bridge would be crazy cool. A bridge could have a retainer bar added which seats seven at the table, but that needs some heavy thinking for appearance, functionality and how to fabricate it reliably.
  3. I wouldn't. Dremels are terrible. The most they are useful for is evacuating pockets when inlaying. Making a plunge base is better than buying the overpriced accessory of course!
  4. Smaller lip and spur drill bits can be problematic as there's not much meat to make a good centred point and concentric brads. I centrepunch mind and just use a fine twist drill bit. I'd recommend trying out a pin vise which is a small finger drilling tool. Most of the work is in centring the punch.
  5. See what happens, but always go with open eyes if it's both feet!
  6. Adding something new to my skillset or reinforcing existing skills is key. I do need the practice for spraying. Thanks for weighing in!
  7. Very cool. I imagine a seam on the centre line would drive lots of people crazy!
  8. Sure, sure. I definitely agree that cutting a slice off a blank, laying in a truss rod and glueing it back up is more or less the same thing when it comes down to it. The trick there is in the cleanliness and suitability of the mating surfaces, plus the correct adhesive and clamping pressure. Most people don't put enough pressure into clamping when glueing up, which often leads to the false idea that gluelines are always a thing....not true....they just need as much care and work as the rest of the job. The largest issue with drilling is deflection within the cut. If the diameter weren't so small and the length so large, I would think that a boring bar would be the way forward. Either that or a 6" diameter truss rod.
  9. This thread is part of a larger idea, which is for ProjectGuitar.com members to vote on which guitar I build as the last of 2021. Each idea has a specific meaning to me which I'll be exploring within each of these four threads. Find the main thread here: https://www.projectguitar.com/forums/topic/54175-vote-on-my-last-build-of-2021/ ---- This thread is specific to my ideas of building a guitar based on something somewhere between the Fender Jaguar (common) and the similar Fender Marauder (rare AF). My fascination with the Fender Jaguar started after I spotted a HH (modded) Jag in Igorrr's "The Making Of Savage Sinusoid". I've always thought that the offset switch and control panel individuality of the Jag had unmistakeable cool. Then you go and make it do something that it was never intended to in the first place. Similar to the BC Rich Mockingbird proposal, I think this could be made into a super flexible guitar well beyond the scope of the original. In principle however, the DNA will be very very much a Jaguar but perhaps with a more convential scale.
  10. Oh cool! A Moon Guitar! They made Larry Graham's favourite Jazz basses from what I remember. I agree that wear will make a dyed fingerboard look terrible. Finishing is the only way around that, and few guitarists enjoy the feel of sticky gloss under their fingers. I'm imagine that infusing the fingerboard with a dyed resin would be the most successful way to manage this to get a board that doesn't wear back to natural. Yes, torrefied wood is brittle. The last company I worked for spent hundreds of thousands in equipment and time researching whether other woods could be treated using torrefaction to rival Teak. Of course not. Teak is durable for other reasons, not just cells taking on/losing moisture. Torrefied wood also weathers very quickly. Outdoors it goes grey in no time. The dust clogs up filters and your lungs, plus structurally it is getting towards being "questionable". It's stable. That's the only real advantage.
  11. I've not seen it done for a number of reasons....one is that there isn't any discernible advantage from making a neck in this fashion beyond uniqueness, gimmickry, etc. The second is that it's a technical challenge to drill a dead straight small bore through a piece of wood. One that doesn't appear to justify the end. Any wander and the truss rod will want to "act" in a direction different to that required. A straight truss rod can only act on a neck that is already bowing. It cannot dial anything "into" a flat neck with zero action, and will need to exert an excessively-large force to counteract any actual bow. I'd enjoy the technical challenge, because that's what I get the most out of. I fail to see the use beyond this though!
  12. As explained elsewhere, I was left with a big chunk of laminated Sapele with Black Walnut pinstripes which I believe is large enough to complete a neck-through Mockingbird. The build that this blank came from was a Firebird; it's tempting to add in that raised centre section here as well! The main feature of this guitar is the electronics, which should eak out every ounce of flex from the pickups and their combinations. Loosely, this was a dual-volume/master tone/three-way toggle circuit with modifiers; coil cut for each humbucker, a phasing switch plus a 5-position varitone. My interpretation of this circuit would be slightly different. Firstly, I re-wire my tone pots to act on the neck pickup only. That's a small stylistic nuance. The coil cuts and phasing are relatively standard. The varitone however, is far from that. My intention here would be to repurpose the Aria Pro II BB preamp I make; in the Aria Pro II SB-1o00, this preamp came with a 6-way active LPF varitone whose mid bump recharacterised the instrument perfectly in all six settings. This would require a little mathematics and tweaking of the RC matrix, but should still produce a great guitar varitone with tons of flexibility in combination with the rest of the switching. Beyond this, the design brief for the Mockingbird itself is very loose outside of the existing material constraints. I imagine that the wings will be laminated Sapele/black Walnut to tie in with the neck-through part, however ideas can be thrown around. The pickup choice is of course dual humbucker, with suggestions taken on HBs that split nicely. I've never cared for most buckers split tones, but hey. Bridge choice is open, however I will likely err towards a fixed bridge of some sort. A compound scale could be an option here!
  13. This thread is part of a larger idea, which is for ProjectGuitar.com members to vote on which guitar I build as the last of 2021. Each idea has a specific meaning to me which I'll be exploring within each of these four threads. Find the main thread here: https://www.projectguitar.com/forums/topic/54175-vote-on-my-last-build-of-2021/ ---- This thread is specific to my ideas of building a guitar based on the BC Rich Mockingbird. I've always been fascinated by the early Bernie Rico boutique instruments, the wood combinations and crazy electronics. This will be that.
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