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Plain Wood Only, No Coat...bad? Wax? Oil? How?


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Its an EX series solid electric guitar, poplar wood, i think, which i heatgunn and strippered down to the raw wood. Now i want it pretty much unpainted and unsealed. Is this a bad idea? Should I at least wipe some wax furniture polish on it. The reason for this "leave it" approach is - lack of access to materials of any specialist nature. We have a hardware store here for general home/farm stuff. Postal system hardly works for letters, everything else gets "lost".

So i thought it might be okay to just leave it natural sanded finish. Unless i can use a little clear from a rattle-can. I don't want to fuss with fillers and stains and such.. Hope help cometh. Thanks in advance..... Tom

Edited by MoreGearThanSkill
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You need some kind of solid finish on the neck, to keep it from warping.

The body is thick enough that warping won't be a problem. If you want a fairly naked finish, for the body, get some paste wax. Follow the instructions on the can: apply a thin coat, let dry, then buff off, repeat. It darkens the color a little bit. It's a flat finish that leaves the wood looking raw. Re-wax as necessary.

Edited by tirapop
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looks like everyone's going to have an opinion on this one. :D if it was me i'd go to that local hardware store and get a can of tung oil or minwax hand rubbed finish or or any kind of hand rubbed furniture finish or even a can of plain old boiled linseed oil and rub the hole thing down with a couple of coats of either. the linseed oil will darken it considerably by the way.

if they're all available get a small can of linseed oil, one of turpentine and one of varnish. mix equal parts of each and apply generously. after 4-5 minutes wipe it all off and let it set over night. do it again the next day. continue until you get the look that you like and let it set for a couple more days until it's cured out.

i don't know..is that worth 2 cents?

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You need some kind of solid finish on the neck, to keep it from warping. 

I've never heard of that. From what I understand, the Zakk Wylde Les Paul has a bare maple finish. Also, necks made out of rosewood (as well as other woods I'm sure) don't need a finish either.

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You need some kind of solid finish on the neck, to keep it from warping. 

I've never heard of that. From what I understand, the Zakk Wylde Les Paul has a bare maple finish. Also, necks made out of rosewood (as well as other woods I'm sure) don't need a finish either.

This is from the Warmoth site:

WARRANTY ISSUES

To validate our warranty, a hard finish must be sufficiently thick to completely cover the wood. This means no wood is exposed and you are actually playing on the finish and not on the wood, oil finishes are not satisfactory. It doesn't matter to us who applies the finish, as long as it's done well. Of course, we would like to do the finishing for you but if you choose to do it yourself or have it done elsewhere, the warranty will still be valid.

Wood will warp from moisture... like from your sweaty hands. Something like a neck that's already under string tension and pretty skinny for playability is particularly sensitive. Yeah, there are some woods that don't require finish as fingerboards. Most necks aren't made entirely of those woods. Most production necks are maple or mahogany. They require a finish.

Edited by tirapop
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nice one guys! I popped into the local hardware store. The one that has a nice "woodworking" section. I found some Danish Oil ( http://www.rustins.co.uk/Dano.html ). It seems mainly a Tung based oil. And i found the 0000 steel wool. I have not touched the Ibanez neck. Body only. I am busy with my final sanding, then wet sanding. Then I'll do the oil and work it off/in with the steel wool. Then again. then another wipe on. Then polish it a little.

Yay!

Tom

Edited by MoreGearThanSkill
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Now I'm looking at the smooth-sanded wood, which i've been lovingly sanding with progressively finer sanding paper... and I'm wondering about staining the wood a little darker. The wood, I think in the Ibanez EX series is poplar. It looks like PINE! Should/could i stain it to make it a bit more butterscotch? Will my Tung oil still work after a lil staining?

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Mr MetalMan, I'm not so sure which EX it is. I got it off a buddy who had ruined it. Dropped it and such. It has a H S H pickup config. It has a TRS Floyd Rose Licenced trem. Those aggro triangle inlays on the fretboard. Rosewood board. Body was cream with a black scratchplate. Headstock is black. Neck is maple. Body is real pale. 5 piece. Quite savage. Not super pretty grade of wood. But i'm having fun with my first Project. Heck the stripping and sanding has been a horrible task. That coat sure is thick thick thick.

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Now I'm looking at the smooth-sanded wood, which i've been lovingly sanding with progressively finer sanding paper... and I'm wondering about staining the wood a little darker.  The wood, I think in the Ibanez EX series is poplar.  It looks like PINE!  Should/could i stain it to make it a bit more butterscotch?  Will my Tung oil still work after a lil staining?

the oil will darken it, if that's all you're looking for. otherwise, i think it works over stain.

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This weekend i finished up, and re-assembled the guitar. I decided to do a little stain job on the bare wood. Mostly because it looked so pale and was less attractive than my kitchen chopping board! So a little cherry-wood stain. It was one of those noxious alchohol-imbedded type (which is now in my fingernail binding). It looked blotchy, and took to the wood with vary-ing enthusiasm. Which would be fine in a one piece body. But in a 5-piece it makes the individual planks stick out. Oh well. I did not do this for the asthetics really. So i sanded it back a bit. Which made it look quite nice. I then did the danish oil thing. Then cut back. Then 0000 steel wooled the next coat. Then more Danish oil. Always wiping it off after about 10 min. Nice satiny finish. Yay. Then all bits back in. Blocked the trem. Tuned up and I'm certainly certain it sounds better. No heavy coat strangling the wood's resonance. She sings. Pics soon. Lesson learned: Not an afternoon's labor. Try a month's spare time!

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