Jump to content

Lucite Diy Guitar?


Recommended Posts

I just got a hold of a large chunk of lucite.

I was thinking of making a one of a kind using this material,actually a sandwich of lucite and a plank of maple in the middle.

HAs anybody tried anything similar?.

Pros/cons/caveats.................

Thanks

Aharon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lucite? Like, the plastic stuff? That's pretty cool!

No really helpful comments here, sorry :D but the post caught my eye because my dad, who is guiding me on my build, got inspired and mentioned a couple days ago that he wants to make a guitar out of corian (He's awesome with a router and a lathe, and has spent a lot of time making candlesticks, countertops, covers, everything).

Hey, if you've got the material, why not? Give it a shot, man, be creative. I've heard, seen, and read about lots of guitars being built out of weird material, and I see nothing wrong with being unconventional. I know most people are going to skewer me for saying this... *dons kevlar vest* but it's an electric guitar, right? Doesn't that mean the focus is on the electronics anyways? :D hahahahaha

Have fun!

-Xanthus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unconventional materials are great especially if you can actually play the instrument you built. You can build guitars out of metal, plastic, concrete, whatever, but if it's a bitch to stand up on stage with for three hours, why bother?

I'd be curious about the Corian guitar, especially with the expense of the material and the finished weight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW, a corian guitar would weigh a friggin' ton...

Lucite, though is a continuous material. meaning that it is softer than a cast material and scratched faily easily. That's not a huge deal, but crazing is. Crazing is the effect of small cracks within the material that can be seen but not felt. This is caused by pressure and contact with solvents. Though if careful crazing can be avoided too. My main concern is how you are planning on adhearing the sandwich. Acrylics are solvent welded together which won't adhear to wood and glues will destroy your clarity. There is a thicker solvent called weld-on #16 (it is essentially a solvent with solids already dissolved into it, clear) that "may" fill wood pores enough to adheare.

Plasics are my realm and you have me intregued...

Keep us posted.

R-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw this yesterday and I thought you might find it interesting:

http://www.mimf.com/cgi-bin/WebX?50@238.yj...z.0@.1dcf75a2/0

Danelectro made some hollow lucite guitars IIRC

And as theres also this:

http://images.misupply.com/products/origin...mpeg/478905.jpg

I think the guy in the foo fighters has one of those

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeh dave grohl has quite a few, this may be of interest i found it on the ampeg site

"Dan Armstrong Reissue Guitar

Ampeg is reissuing the Ampeg Dan Armstrong acrylic guitar which features a completely unique body made of an eye-catching clear Plexiglas material that eliminates unwanted vibrations and frequencies, while producing tremendous sustain. The Ampeg Dan Armstrong guitar also features a removable pickup system that allows users to choose between two different hand-made pickups—the faithfully recreated Rock Treble pickup and a new dual blade Rock Sustain pickup."

i remember reading that small scratches can simply be polished out of a lucite guitar if thats of any interest

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies guys.

Sumphead,that was also my concern,how to glue it together.....

I will keep you posted as it comes along,now I need a piece of maple which I'll get locally.

Whish me luck.

Thanks and keep the ideas and/or tips comming .......

Aharon

Edited by Aharon
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why would you put Maple in the middle, wouldn't that defeat the entire purpose of a Lucite guitar?

BTW, I built a 100% plexiglass guitar about 20 years ago, you need different techniques and tooling to deal with that stuff, and it's heavy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BTW, I built a 100% plexiglass guitar about 20 years ago,

100%? as in plexiglass neck too?

Or do you mean a 100% plexiglass guitar body?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regular tools for the most part are fine. I cut sheet on a delta X5 10" table saw (52" beisy fence cause' hell yeah, it's heavy). Sheets can be laminated together seamlessly but it take a lot of practice. I use all different router bits from cheaper Bosch to Whiteside, so regular old router bits work fine. Again on the type of material you are using: You said you have Lucite, do you know which type? Does it still have the paper on it? Possible Lucite E, LL, or GP? This plays a HUGE factor in how you work with it as Extuded materials are not as dense as Cast and have a much lower melting point.

On the table saw I use a High tooth count (110) triple chip carbide blade to eliminate blade melt and get a smooth cut. Though if you are cleaning with a router after it doesn't matter as much.

HTH,

R-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahh, I can tell by the smell when cutting. I know, I know, the fumes are getting to me. Anyway extruded material isn't bad just a little more difficult to work with. Fortunately in 3/8" thickness there is only one manufacturer I know of that makes a true extruded (and it's an import). So chances are that you have what is called a continuous material, or continuous cast. Which is still extruded but pressed after for a cast like quility. It is somewhere in the middle as far as quality goes.

Where do you live?

R-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was going to offer to send some solvents and scraps, but combustables across the border is a big no-no. Look in the phone book under plastics for a local fabricator. They should be able to get you cut-offs for next to nothing to practice on and should sell weld-on solvents. Look for weld-on#16 or #5 (liquid). It should be fairly cheap. I would think the #16 should suffice just fine. If you got another chunk of 3/8" you could try to laminte them together. It takes a bit of practice, thus the scraps, but it isn't that hard to laminate acrylics together seemlessly. Good solvent coverage and good clamps is key. I would actually consider laminating a differnt color acrylic between the two sheets of clear, it would be a pretty neat effect. If you have any specific questions don't hesititate to ask.

I swear I can't type...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Bought wood today.....nothing fancy....poplar.

This is my firrst guitar after all,did not want to go all out with the fancy woods....yes I know,I should not be experimenting with plastics before I get a decent wood guitar built but I could not resist.

Will keep you posted and when I get something resembling a guitar together I'll post pics.

Aharon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As per your suggestion..Weld-on #5 or #16.

Due to weight concern and other random factors it's going to be a thinline tele so there's going to be two chambers....I don't know if I can cut the f holes neatly tho'....I'll have to go slow.....

Thanks again Sumphead

Aharon

Edited by Aharon
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...