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Safe-t-planer With Router


brian d
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G'day Brian,

I picked up a safe-t-planer from carbatec in springvale 2 weeks ago.

It's a great multipurpose tool, which you can also use to make neck cauls or even radiused rubbing blocks when tilted at the appropriate angle. :D

As far as using it in a router..........BIG NO NO. all to do with revs per min.

But perfect for the drill press. an absolute dream to use too.

On the box it warns against router use, and I'd heed that warning. (at the speeds the average router turns at, you'd want to rename it the 'where did my fingers go-planer' :D

cheers Brian,

Stu

(even with variable speed, I'd be cautious of the repercussions.)

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Thanks for the warnings everybody. I suspected this to be the case, but wanted to check before doing any wishful thinking experimentation. Drill press it is.

Stu, how do you get radiused blocks from it. Won't it give an elliptical cross section rather than round when placed and an angle?

Regards,

Brian.

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Stu, how do you get radiused blocks from it. Won't it give an elliptical cross section rather than round when placed and an angle?

Yes Brian, that's spot on............and you would think there would be a fairly discernable difference in the profile of a Stew-Mac 12" radius block and a safe-t-planer on angle. I thought so too :D (stay with me, I'm getting to the crux of the biscuit)

I currently have in my hot little left hand, a 12" Stew-mac Radius block.

And in my right I have, yep that's right. The aforementioned safe-t-planer.

Now , when holding up the cutting implement to the radius block you can pivot the cutter until you get the desired cutting angle which,( everybody gasps in amazement :D ) matches the radius block contour with no discernable difference in angle. (to my eyes anyway, which are 20/20 and not akin to anything less than perfection......well, close to it.

All I can say is, If you've got a safe-t-planer, give it a go and you'll see just how well this little baby works.

You'll also find the results are even better for 14", 16" and 20" radiuses.

Give it a go peoples, and let's hear if it works for you. Just tilt your drill press bench to the required angle. :D

The instructions on the box show you how, and whats more, isn't bending the safety guidelines of use.

Close to foolproof and a time saver.

cheers,

Stu B)

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I currently have in my hot little left hand, a 12" Stew-mac Radius block.

And in my right I have, yep that's right. The aforementioned safe-t-planer.

Now , when holding up the cutting implement to the radius block you can pivot the cutter until you get the desired cutting angle which,( everybody gasps in amazement :D ) matches the radius block contour with no discernable difference in angle.

Thanks Stu,

I had my visit to Carbatec and have the Safe-T-Planer. I'll try it to make the radius block. You think Vic Ash is a decent wood for a radius block?

I also downloaded the StewMac instructions for using he Safe-T-Planer for instrument building, so I don't need to build that thicknessing jig for the router.....I just need to buy a drill press :D

Regards,

Brian.

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O.k. I've just been out in the garage and produced a 12" radius block 12' long in one minute.

that's right. one minute. (Can hardly believe it myself. it's too bloody easy.)

5 degree angle on the drill press bench, and using a timber guide.

run the timber from right to left for the smoothest and safest cut, and voila.........

there's your radius block which is the same width as the stew-mac ones

I've got pictures just taken, but in the biggest frustration of all, I don't even know how to post 'em.

(slight technophobia kicking in. :D )

p.s Brian, tas oak/vic ash will last you a lifetime :D

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Ok, I'll bite.... why would you get a Safe-T-planer if you haven't got a drill press?! You can't use it safely in anything other than a drill press... don't even think about using it a hand drill.

Hello Setch,

I have a sort of press...it's a stand that a standard drill fits into and plunges down. It works pretty well for drilling straight holes, and I imagine would work well with the Safe-T-Planer for narrow pieces - necks and fretboards for example. But the column to spindle distance would be too small for bodies. As the router thicknessing jig is so obviously out of the question, I'll look at a "proper" drill press with a minimum 20 cm column to spindle distance, so I can thickness body halves at least.

BTW, are there significant advantages to radial arm drill presses for guitar building?

Anything in particular to look for if I want to use it as a fret press as well?

Thanks,

Brian.

O.k. I've just been out in the garage and produced a 12" radius block 12' long in one minute.

Cool!

The cost of the wood for the blocks will be even less than the postage for the Stewmac radius block!

I owe you a beer or three! :D

Thanks,

Brian. :D

Edited by brian d
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attempting to post a pic of a stew-mac 12"radius block and a freshly cut one on the safe-t-planer.

If I learn how to post the pics I'll do a tutorial tomorrow. Please bare with my lack of technical skills. :D

DSC03677.jpg

bugger. what's the magic formula for pic posting?

just joined photobucket. :D

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I have a sort of press...it's a stand that a standard drill fits into and plunges down. It works pretty well for drilling straight holes, and I imagine would work well with the Safe-T-Planer for narrow pieces - necks and fretboards for example. But the column to spindle distance would be too small for bodies. As the router thicknessing jig is so obviously out of the question, I'll look at a "proper" drill press with a minimum 20 cm column to spindle distance, so I can thickness body halves at least.

I would not try and use the safe-T-planer in a drill stand. It is a dangerous tool despite the name, it needs a sturdy drill press with a sturdy table.

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+100!

You need a completely rigid setup to use a safe T planer. 1 hint of flex, and the edge will grab, and something very dramatic will happen, possibly involving a permentant and entirely unplanned alteration to you or your work piece.

Don't even try it.

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attempting to post a pic of a stew-mac 12"radius block and a freshly cut one on the safe-t-planer.

If I learn how to post the pics I'll do a tutorial tomorrow. Please bare with my lack of technical skills. :D

DSC03677.jpg

bugger. what's the magic formula for pic posting?

just joined photobucket. :D

Looks like it turned out great man! I'm very interested in the tutorial. If you need anymore help with picture posting, or anything about picture posting, PM me.

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Looks great, Stu! How did you work out the angle to get the right radius? Trial and error or is there a more scientific way?

I take everyone's advice and am now in the market for a drill press instead of the drill stand I have.

Any advice on what to look for? Apart from drilling holes, I will also want to use it for the Safe-T-Planer, including planing and thicknessing of body halves and later for acoustic top and back halves. I will also want to use it for pressing frets and for a microplane rotary shaper (like a robo-sander).

Is there any advantage to radial arm drill press?

The two that I'm looking at now are Carbatec (swing 130-420mm) and GMC (can get it for $199 on e-bay). I'm open to other suggestions, but the choice may be limited in Australia.

Thanks for any pointers in choosing a drill press.

Brian.

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Working out the radius is all done with a radius gauge, either bought or made as a template.

Or you can work straight off another sanding block as I did. (p.s. made a 2 foot long radiused sanding block on the safe-t-planer and pedestal drill no more than two hours ago.)

Enough of that for now.......... just in the process of colating photos and the appropriate wording

for a tutorial on that subject. :D It Should be fairly useful.

I got my pedestal drill from Carbatec. You'll see it in action on a future post.

LINK

No regrets there. :D

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