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Truss And Cf In The Same Cavity?


NJD
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I had plans to rout out my CF rod and truss rod cavities today and epoxy the CF in place too, but I realised that I have the wrong sized bit for routing my CF cavities!! it's oversized (unless they are meant to have a LOT of play!!) after a lot of thought I think I may be able to get around the idea by:

Routing the trussrod cavity, then widening it to the depth of my CF rods and then epoxying them into place so that the truss rod can sit in between them...

Like so:

TrussRodPlacement.JPG

What are people's views on doing this? Will it, in your view, cause any detriment to the trussrod's functionality or bring about other issues?

Many thanks in advance,

Nathan :D :D

Edited by NJD
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I only see one problem with it. From what I understand, CF rods are only effective if they are epoxied into their slot. If you put them on each side of the truss rod, it would be extremely difficult, even impossible, to epoxy them in satisfactorily. However, this is all just conjecture.

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One thing that come to my mind:

I have showed in an old thread (through an experiment with three different neck blanks) that the resistance to twisting is dependent of the distance from CF to the center line of the neck (do a search if you are interested). The greater the distance, the higher resistance against warping. Then again, most people don’t use CF to prevent warping, so you might be perfectly all right.

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I only see one problem with it. From what I understand, CF rods are only effective if they are epoxied into their slot. If you put them on each side of the truss rod, it would be extremely difficult, even impossible, to epoxy them in satisfactorily. However, this is all just conjecture.

I'm quite confident that with shims and clamps I can glue the CF rods in place with gluing surfaces on the outer and under edges (see pic below)

TrussRodPlacementArrows.JPG

One thing that come to my mind:

I have showed in an old thread (through an experiment with three different neck blanks) that the resistance to twisting is dependent of the distance from CF to the center line of the neck (do a search if you are interested). The greater the distance, the higher resistance against warping. Then again, most people don’t use CF to prevent warping, so you might be perfectly all right.

Ah, i didn't think about the warp factor (boom boom) but as you say, that didn't really count as a main reason for installing CF in the first place but thanks for bringing it up :D .

Edited by NJD
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