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Could I Still Use This?


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Hi all,

I recently bought an ebony fingerboard from Craft Supplies here in UK.

Shock horror it came home broken. [note the sarcasm?]

No bloody wonder either - it was packed with one layer of bubble wrap and then wrapped in brown paper! :D

Got another on it's way already, and with proper packaging too!

Anyway - question is: can I still use the broken 'board?

It has a clean break right across the 2nd fret (it's already radiused and slotted), and will sit together very tightly again.

I know I could use it for fretting practice, but it seems a bit of a waste to do that if I could use as a fingerboard again!

Any thoughts guys?

I could post pics if it would help.

Thanks,

DJ

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I would say don't use it. Your idea about practicing fretting is much better.

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I would say don't use it. Your idea about practicing fretting is much better.

Yeah, that's what I'm thinking just now......

In addition to fretting practice, you could always use it to make small parts (truss rod covers, pickup bezels, etc.).

Good point! Hadn't thought of that! It's already slotted, but I could still make some use of it. It has cost me nothing anyway!

Thanks for the thoughts guys!

DJ

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Or, if it's only broken at the 2nd fret, make the new nut slot at the 2nd or 3rd fret position, chop off the broken excess, figure out the new scale length, and make some sort of interesting short-scale instrument. with the remainder. An even shorter than student scale mustang? A longer scale Uke? A bouzouki? I don't know. Could be fun.

Heck, I play half my tunes capoed at the third fret anyway. . .

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This is one of those things where it all depends on the way it cracked and how well you can fix things. If you look at a fretboard that is slotted, you have little strength left at the slots(there just is not much left). If the break or crack can be cleanly reconnected, I personally could and would fix it. If it is a sloppy break don't waste your time. This is where common sense comes into play. your biggest concern would be making sure it can be cleanly put back together, final strength is not at issue, accuracy of fit and a clean seamless look is.

Peace,Rich

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You could also bind the fretboard to hide any existing cracks. Once glued to the neck the board would naturally want to compress the fracture together which would help to put pressure on the fret that has to go into the slot. Since it didn’t cost you anything I’d use it to learn on by fixing it and successfully gluing it to a neck. Throw some binding on it and no one will ever know it was fractured. That’s more experiencing than using it for fretting practice.

You could also use it for a short scale guitar too. That would be interesting. Since it’s pre slotted you would just measure the same as you would on the board before it was broken. Nut to 12th, double it, 12th to bridge.

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Thanks for your input fellas!

This is one of those things where it all depends on the way it cracked and how well you can fix things. If you look at a fretboard that is slotted, you have little strength left at the slots(there just is not much left). If the break or crack can be cleanly reconnected, I personally could and would fix it. If it is a sloppy break don't waste your time. This is where common sense comes into play. your biggest concern would be making sure it can be cleanly put back together, final strength is not at issue, accuracy of fit and a clean seamless look is.

Peace,Rich

Yeah, I'm happy to hear that final strength isn't the issue here, cos that's kinda what I thought - I mean, it would be glued onto the neck along the entire length if it was gonna be used again obviously.

The break is quite clean:

brokenfingerboard2.jpg

I mean it has a slightly ragged edge, but at least it runs nicely along the fret slot and not diagonally!

You could also bind the fretboard to hide any existing cracks. Once glued to the neck the board would naturally want to compress the fracture together which would help to put pressure on the fret that has to go into the slot. Since it didn’t cost you anything I’d use it to learn on by fixing it and successfully gluing it to a neck. Throw some binding on it and no one will ever know it was fractured. That’s more experiencing than using it for fretting practice.

You could also use it for a short scale guitar too. That would be interesting. Since it’s pre slotted you would just measure the same as you would on the board before it was broken. Nut to 12th, double it, 12th to bridge.

Good thinking about the binding! I've never bound anything before, although I do know how to do it.

The short scale idea appeals as well. It was a 24 fret 'board before the break, so now it would become a 22 fret job! Am I right in thinking I could simply measure nut to 12th, and use that distance again to calculate the bridge position? Bearing in mind it's pre-slotted, would all the remaining frets be in the right positions?? It was a 25.5" scale length before the break.

You can use it to laminate a body.

Do you mean slice it very thinly to get enough out of it?

Thanks all!

DJ

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