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whisky182
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:D i know there are already atleast two topics on this already, but this one is slightly differant.

i want to put some LED's around my pick guard. B)

1 can anyone e-mail me a wireing diagram on how to put in:

8 LEDs

1 Les paul style switch (for the on/off bit(i thought this would look the best (it's a three way switch though)))

and a battery (and what voltage is needed!!)

2 any suggestions on LED colour?! my guitar is black ane white (zebra style) with a white pickguard!

cheers for any help!!

ps my e-mail is...

worldsworstguitarist@hotmail.com

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This setup works for me:

gt_led.jpg

Note: This circuit diagram assumes you're using ultra-bright blue or white LEDs - for other colors, the resistor(s) will need to be recalculated. Find the forward voltage drop of the LED you want to use and plug it into this calculator. Follow the instructions, and specify 20 mA as the LED current - don't forget to use double the forward voltage drop for two LEDS in series. Then all you've got to do is figure out how to mount them.

This will give you some idea of how bright this circuit is:

Leddark.jpg

It hurts your eyes to look directly at them on axis, and you can read by this array in a dark room. Battery life won't be great, and they'll slowly dim as the battery wears down, but if you only switch them on for gigs, it shouldn't be a problem.

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Note: This circuit diagram assumes you're using ultra-bright blue or white LEDs - for other colors, the resistor(s) will need to be recalculated. Find the forward voltage drop of the LED you want to use and plug it into this calculator. Follow the instructions, and specify 20 mA as the LED current - don't forget to use double the forward voltage drop for two LEDS in series. Then all you've got to do is figure out how to mount them.

i don't know that much about electricity,

i know how to make a parallel circuit, but i don't know that much about resistors and stuff like that!!! will i need a resistor in this circuit?!

i need colour sugestions and approximate prices on these (i'm asuming that they're pretty cheap!)

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I don't like the ultra-bright LED's that much personally. Since you're doing it on the body and not the neck, haveyou considered using fiber optics instead of mounting the LED's directly? You can save a lot of power consumption that way but findign parts could be a hassle.

I've mentioned before that I've done several necks/fretboards with LEDs and can't wait to get away from them. They're nice to look at but a real pain in the butt to install. Try www.theledlight.com for info (technical info at the bottom) on LED circuits. The biggest issue is limiting the current - LEDs don't like too much current so that's why the resistor is there. The other issue you'll have is battery life. Don't expect much from a normal 9V - they are one of the worst choices in terms of battery life but the best in terms of finding a battery box for a guitar.

Good luck, I hope it ends up worth the effort.

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man if your using an LP style switch which is the 3 way toggle then you could actually do something seriouslly funkeh

imagine if you will:-

switch in the centre things are off

switch it one way and the LEDs are blue

switch it the other way and they're orange

you can get LEDs which are a different colour depending upon which way round they are connected and so i reckon that you could do something like that. if you're interested i can find out the relevant info etc for ya

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:D i just wanna put some simple LEDs around my pickguard, is rhat so much to ask?!

thanks for the effort guys, but i just wanna juse LEDs, i'm new to this, and not loaded with cash, so i think i'll scrap the Fiber optic idea, and i don't want it getting too confusing, so i'll scrap the Orange/blue idea!!!

I think Blue led's would look the best, with my guitar!!!

can any one tell me what power/colour resistor i will need with:

8 blue LEDs,

1 three way switch,

1 9v battery!

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i just wanna put some simple LEDs around my pickguard, is rhat so much to ask?!

And everyone here is trying to help you do that - unfortunately, it's a bit difficult to explain a circuit to someone who doesn't "know that much about electricity". No diss intended, it's simply easier to explain to some one who knows something about it. I'll try to keep it simple, but if I confuse you, ask and I'll explain further. Clarity isn't always my strong suite.

can any one tell me what power/colour resistor i will need with:

8 blue LEDs,

1 three way switch,

1 9v battery!

You'll need 4 100 ohm 1/8 watt resistors.Wire one resistor in series with each pair of blue LEDS, then wire the four circuits in parallel, one end to the switch and the other to the battery. Be sure you don't reverse the polarity on the LEDs - you will most likely destroy them. LSDiodes has blues for less than $.50 each, and reasonable shipping. Their tutorial (here) should help you understand how to hook it all up. They even offer resistors for your shopping convenience. Now all you've got to do is get a switch, and wire it all up. Good luck, hope that helps.

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i just wanna put some simple LEDs around my pickguard, is rhat so much to ask?!

Sounds like you're a bit lost and frustrated. Have you looked at www.theledlight.com (in the technical area)? They aren't simple to install in a neck but maybe a body would be easier - I don't know. I have a good electrical background so the circuits are not an issue for me but I think that site explains it at a level that everyone can understand. I don't think having someone else tell you what resistor(s) to use is going to be enough to get it done. You're going to need to know what you are doing at some point. I guess you could fumble around with the wires and solder until something lights up but why not try to understand it first?

Oh, I think you'll be dissapointed with the battery life for your 1 9V but there's plenty supply of them if you have the $$$.

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i'm being a pain in the ass again, i've changed my mind, i want RED LEDs in my circut!!! i think i've almost got this sorted, a few more questions though...

can i put all 8 of the LEDs in a parallel circut

(with out doing this...

You'll need 4 100 ohm 1/8 watt resistors.Wire one resistor in series with each pair of blue LEDS, then wire the four circuits in parallel, one end to the switch and the other to the battery. Be sure you don't reverse the polarity on the LEDs - you will most likely destroy them. LSDiodes has blues for less than $.50 each, and reasonable shipping. Their tutorial (here) should help you understand how to hook it all up. They even offer resistors for your shopping convenience. Now all you've got to do is get a switch, and wire it all up. Good luck, hope that helps.
)

could i insted either...

1 put a resistor with each LED (if so, what power?!!?)

2 put a big resistor just before the wire splits in to 8 (to go to the LEDs)

and what is the "Voltage Drop Across LED"

and what "led current would i want (in milliamps)"

(all found here!!!)

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and what is the "Voltage Drop Across LED"

Once you know what your LED's will be then you can get this info.

Usually for red LED's the voltage will be around 2 to 3 volts. I believe the typical current to design for is around 15 to 20 mA but check into this once you know what you are buying. Manufacturers provide specs for both of these key elements of your design.

Mouser.com has a decent selection and they have the spec sheets clickable next to each product.

You can do one resistor in series with all LED's or one resistor for each (in parallel). There are advantages to both ways. The advantage to the one higher wattage resistor is that there's less components. One disadvantage is that you'll see a varying brightness if one fails (fails open) and if several fail you may end up burning out the rest. I don't think it's much of an issue though so don't let that scare you away.

One advantage to using multiple resistors is that they can be much smaller in wattage (and therefore size). If you're planning on buying from a place like radioshack you're likely to find them unlike the larger wattage where they tend to stock limited ohm values.

To sum it up - the decision to use a series or parallel circuit depends on how you want to handle LED failure and how much you care about the size of the resistor and availability. 1/4 watt resistors are easy to find locally (even though you only need 1/8 to 1/10 W for a parallel circuit). It's really up to you and doesn't matter too much in my opinion. I personally have been using the parallel circuit for necks.

Here's the link to the LED basics that I've been pushing on people lately. It's really good and worth a few minutes if you haven't checked it out yet. It answers most of your circuit questions.

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One way to make your 9V battery last longer is to put as many LEDs in series as possible. For example, if each LED drops 2V, put 4 LEDs in series and add a resistor in series with them to drop the remaining 1V. That way you would consume 20mA (or whatever the particular LED is rated at) for 4 LEDs instead of 20mA for each LED x4 (or 80mA instead of 20) and waste a lot of battery power across the resistors. The drawback is that if one burns open, that will cut the current to the other 3.

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My opinion on the 9V issue is to just not use them unless you really have to. Take a look at the average maH ratings for the various common battery types. AAA or AA batteries take up more space but will last many times more than a 9V. If you absolutely must use a 9V due to the convenience of having a battery box, I'd suggest using the dual battery box and put them in parallel. You're still paying big $$ for them but it will allow you a bit more time between changing them. The 9V is the worst maH rated battery that you can select unless you get into the little watch batteries and such.

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i'll only be using it for gigs

That's what I was wondering. I remember reading a review somewhere (harmony-central?) of someone's LED inlay and they were complaining that they couldn't make it through a set without the LED's significantly dimming. I don't remember much about the details.

That's it for me on this one.

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