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toddler68

Third Build - Double (neck) Trouble

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Pretty tight fit

IMG_3100.jpg

Hey toddler...looking good so far !

I was wondering how you square off your neck pocket corners. Chisel ? Drill press w/mortise bit ? They look really sharp.

Thanks.

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I very much like the body part of the tenons being wider than the neck - reminds me of a Firebird/Thunderbird! It makes me wonder what a double neck Fire+Thunderbird would look like ;-)

Very well executed and looking forward to the end product!

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Pretty tight fit

IMG_3100.jpg

Hey toddler...looking good so far !

I was wondering how you square off your neck pocket corners. Chisel ? Drill press w/mortise bit ? They look really sharp.

Thanks.

Really sharp chisel... works like a champ. Except, I'm not sure how to re-sharpen it when it gets dull. Maybe I'll just have it professionally sharpened or buy a new one every time :D

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Search MDluthier. He's the guy that taught me a bunch of what I know and he's got sharpening videos on youtube. I swear, everything in his shop can kill you with a tiny graze it's so sharp. At one point (not sure anymore) his vids had more hits than the Lie Neilsen sharpening vids hahaha.

Chris

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Find a local Timber Frame company, I am sure they can point you in the right direction as their chisels need to stay extremely sharp for the line of work.

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Find a local Timber Frame company, I am sure they can point you in the right direction as their chisels need to stay extremely sharp for the line of work.

Just go buy an oil stone, get them in most decent hardware or tool stores. Sharpen your chisels & planes yourself. Its easy enough.

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Sharpening a tool takes a proportionally equivalent time to stock work as does making jigs and vacuuming up chips. The Zen lies within honing tools, methods and equipment. The results are often just an artifact of this ;-)

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I don't know how you've survived without home sharpening stuff. I'm sharpening my planes and chisels all the time!if I had to take them out every time I'd be broke. I'm tellin' ya, watch this series:

and go buy a Norton 4000/8000 yellow/white combo stone and their black/blue diamond plate, and the cheap little $20 chisel/plane woodcraft holder shown. You really don't need all the fancy jigs and tools that cost an arm and a leg. I can shave with all my tools with those 3 things mentioned above.

Chris

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No. 4 1/2 smoothing plane. What can I say, I like a smooth shave hahahaha. That said, that is exactly how I check when my plane are sharp. I test if they will shave my arm hair. I consistently have a patch on my right fore-arm with no hair hahaha.

Chris

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Hey, has my thread been hijacked? :D

But seriously, in the past I've just relied on files and sanding blocks. It wasn't until I made the mortises for my workbench base that I used a chisel for the first time. Man, I couldn't believe the results. Now I am a believer... I guess I'll have to step up and learn the art of sharpening... thanks for the tips, Chris! :D

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looking good, But id chamber out more of it. Double necks can get realy heavy. I have one on the go just now & have almost hollowed out the whole top guitar because of previous experiance.

Any idea of the weight of this one at the moment ?

I was hoping someone would "weigh" in on this subject. I don't want it to be too heavy, but I still want there to be enough structure for sustain. Right now I think I've got it at close to 1" around the perimeter and about 3/8" thickness at the bottom of the cavities. Is there a rule of thumb as far as how much material thickness to leave? 1/2 inch, 1/4 inch?

I'm also planning to rout matching shallow cavities into the topwood before I glue that on. Any other suggestions are greatly appreciated.

Hey, this is a beautiful project.

I have not done a double neck. But on chambered guitars, my practice is to leave 3/8" minimum thickness at the sides (up to 1" where hardware is attached, like strap buttons), and leave 3/16" minimum thickness on the back. You could remove a lot more wood before you hit those numbers. You could also remove wood in the center between the two necks. You could hollow out the underside of the top; but if it is a flat, uncarved top on a chambered guitar, I make the top 3/16" to start with.

No matter how much the body weighs, it still has to balance the necks. I'd rather have a heavy guitar than one with a neck that you have to hold up.

Edited by Ken Bennett

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looking good, But id chamber out more of it. Double necks can get realy heavy. I have one on the go just now & have almost hollowed out the whole top guitar because of previous experiance.

Any idea of the weight of this one at the moment ?

I was hoping someone would "weigh" in on this subject. I don't want it to be too heavy, but I still want there to be enough structure for sustain. Right now I think I've got it at close to 1" around the perimeter and about 3/8" thickness at the bottom of the cavities. Is there a rule of thumb as far as how much material thickness to leave? 1/2 inch, 1/4 inch?

I'm also planning to rout matching shallow cavities into the topwood before I glue that on. Any other suggestions are greatly appreciated.

Hey, this is a beautiful project.

I have not done a double neck. But on chambered guitars, my practice is to leave 3/8" minimum thickness at the sides (up to 1" where hardware is attached, like strap buttons), and leave 3/16" minimum thickness on the back. You could remove a lot more wood before you hit those numbers. You could also remove wood in the center between the two necks. You could hollow out the underside of the top; but if it is a flat, uncarved top on a chambered guitar, I make the top 3/16" to start with.

No matter how much the body weighs, it still has to balance the necks. I'd rather have a heavy guitar than one with a neck that you have to hold up.

Thanks for the advice, Ken. As is stands, I think I've managed to hit most of the thickness numbers you mentioned. For the time being, I'm leaving the chambers where they are until I can get her weighed. I need to borrow a bathroom scale from a neighbor because we are not allowed to have one in our house - wife's rule! My goal is for it not to be any heavier than the average unchambered LP (which is think is around 12 - 13 lbs.). I would prefer heavy rather than unbalanced and I think the client would agree.

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Very nice; I love the carve especially the way the horns are blended into it. I normally go for a more gradual slope on the lower bout, but this works well too. Do you normally set the top before glueing up the fret boards? It seems like that will make dressing the highest frets more difficult that it needs to be.

SR

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Very nice; I love the carve especially the way the horns are blended into it. I normally go for a more gradual slope on the lower bout, but this works well too. Do you normally set the top before glueing up the fret boards? It seems like that will make dressing the highest frets more difficult that it needs to be.

SR

Well, it seems I never do it the same way twice! I've done it both ways, but I'm just more comfortable working on the inlays with the fretboard off. Yeah, it might make the fretwork a little more difficult later, but I could always farm that out to somebody else :D

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