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Grain filling


kench
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I've heard that some people are using epoxy or CA glue to fill the grain on porous woods. How do you prepare them to work as grain filler? And what is CA Glue?

I was looking for a grain filler to fill the pores on my Sapele (a kind of African mahogany). But the fillers that are sold in here (Turkey) are all pastes that are meant to fill the gaps or cracks on the wood. Some of them are quite strong fillers but some of them can be thinned with water, alcohol or thinners. I tested a water-based one with thinning it with water but I saw that huge amount of filler was sucked into the wood after dried. It says on the can "apply several thin coats to fill the big gaps, with 15-20 minutes apart". Do you think it can be used as a grain filler when its thinned with water or alcohol?

And it doesn't look very strong to me. You can scrape the dried surface with your nail. Is this normal? I'm planning to shoot Aerosol Nitro lacquer on it.

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Hmm.. I know Bison brand super glues. But they are sold in very small tubes.

Other than super glue, there are epoxies in double-tubes.

How do you prepare them? Just prepare them in a pot and wipe it on the wood? or do I have to mix or thin them with something. If I'm correct, I've seen Guitarfrenzy used black epoxy from StewMac and mixed with the grain filler?

What I want is to fill few damages on the wood and also fill the grain to level the surface. Do you think I should use both wood filler and grain filler (ca glue, epoxy or actual grain filler that I can't seem to find here :D )

Edited by kench
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Hmm.. I know Bison brand super glues. But they are sold in very small tubes.

Other than super glue, there are epoxies in double-tubes.

How do you prepare them? Just prepare them in a pot and wipe it on the wood? or do I have to mix or thin them with something. If I'm correct, I've seen Guitarfrenzy used black epoxy from StewMac and mixed with the grain filler?

What I want is to fill few damages on the wood and also fill the grain to level the surface. Do you think I should use both wood filler and grain filler (ca glue, epoxy or actual grain filler that I can't seem to find here  :D )

No.. you don't mix it with grain filler. The epoxy itself serves as the grain filler. The reason I used black epoxy was because I wanted the grain pattern to really stand out in the Swamp Ash. Your working with a wood that I would think should only need regular epoxy, just make sure you buy the 90 minute epoxy at least. Just spread it on with a plastic spreader held at a 45°angle, moving in the direction of the grain, pushing it down into the grain as you go. Keep going over it pressing it in, doing small areas at a time then moving on. Let it dry overnight, and sand flush. Repeat if needed. Hope this helps.

Matt Vinson

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Well, this is -slightly- off topic, but it's still grainfilling:

I'm building a bass (neckthru) with some woods that need grainfilling and some that don't. What's the best way to go about doing this? Only grainfill the parts that need it, and sand any excess off the woods that don't after it dries, or grainfill the whole darn thing and sand back flat? I'll probably use epoxy, by the way, and a car paint shop (poly?) finish.

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skibum, i dont think the stuff im talking about dries very fast. so you could just tape mask the body wings off, put down the middle part that needs to be filled, then just pull up the tape for a sharp line. then let it dry and sand down everything flat so neck and wings are both flat

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I would apply it to everything myself.

When you're sanding back, if there were areas that truly didn't need it, they'll just get sanded even again.

Pore-filling some areas by masking off just seems to put a knot in my gut for some reason, just doesn't sound kosh. I could be wrong. I've been wrong before.

Once. :DB):D

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I was talking to a tech the other day and he showed me a guitar he had made many years ago. Said he used CA on the neck - not just as a filler but as a final clear coat. He said that Fender Custom Shop used it on the Clapton models.

I've used it a lot for a grain filler - thank you Drak. Used it on spalted maple, crotch walnut and mahogany. Works great.

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