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Routing Through Shell


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I was wondering... what would happen if you were to inlay a design into a fretboard untapered. And then somewhere down the road when you decide on which kinda taper the board needs you find out the inlay spans enough of the board width wize, that when you route, you will actually have to route away some of the shell that's inlaid. What's gunna happen when the router hits that shell? Is it going to go through it and trim it just like it will the wood aorund it, or is there risk of the shell cracking? Or of it pulling out shell or anything detremental? How high are these risks if hey are there?

Thanks,

Chris

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I was wondering... what would happen if you were to inlay a design into a fretboard untapered. And then somewhere down the road when you decide on which kinda taper the board needs you find out the inlay spans enough of the board width wize, that when you route, you will actually have to route away some of the shell that's inlaid. What's gunna happen when the router hits that shell? Is it going to go through it and trim it just like it will the wood aorund it, or is there risk of the shell cracking? Or of it pulling out shell or anything detremental? How high are these risks if hey are there?

Thanks,

Chris

I think it would be risky if you used a regular wood cutting bit. It would also depend on the type inlay material and thickness. Thin wood may splinter, Shell is pretty delicate and would most likely chip and have a ruff edge( smaller pieces may just rip out), I am not sure about Recon stone. If you routed around it and then came back with a finer bit designed for cutting harder materials you my be able topull it off, but still sounds kinda risky.

Peace,Rich

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Recon stone routes through like butter. This I know for a fact, cause I've done it several times with both small dremel bits AND large router bits. For some reason I think you're assuming that's what I'm doing though. Routing with a smaller bit... cause going around a small piece of inlay sticking out with a 3/4" diameter router bit following a straight edge spinning at several thousand RPM would be slightly difficult...

Chris

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Similarly, how feasible is it to use a Dremel tool with a fine (1mm-2mm) bit in a home-made miniature table router jig for fine cutting of shell? Would it be better and/or easier to use a handsaw instead? Just thinking about speeding up the process without losing the results.

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Yeah, dentists can only use the bits a few time because most wouldn't dream of using a bit that anything less than razor sharp. Ask nicely and you'll never pay for the bits. They work pretty well for routing cavities although sometimes th leave the edges a bit more fuzzy than downcut spiral bits.

peace,

russ

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I'm still trying to understand the original question. I use routers to cut shell, but I have a cam machine, way different. By hand, I would never dream of it. Jeweler's saw for sure. Routing out shell already in a board can be a tricky thing. It can be done if you don't try and cut through all it one pass. The real problem is different materials route at different speeds and pressure. When you go from one material to another it is REALLY easy to screw up and make a real mess. If your not really experience at this, I would not advice it.

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