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Wet Sanding Sg Headstock?


mcrebn
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ok so here's the deal: (excuse my english)

I KNOW there are tutorials, ive read em all... but none of em can tell me what i should choose cause i have to take a decision... and id like to know what you guys think would be closer to a profesionnal finish.

ive put some clear coat spray on my SG copy guitar headstock (the only part im refinishing btw) and now its almost dry and i ALMOST got rid of all the little bubbles and dust on it by applying 3 coats. Should i wait till the coat is COMPLETLY hard and "wet sand" it OR should i just add another final coat without sanding? i have #600 paper grit, is it ok to wet sand with it? but i can buy some more tomorrow.. im using Tremclad Protection top coat/ clear, Gloss. and its supposed to do some good job, but anyways im the problem, not the spray :S

heres the imaging process:

you can see there's this "orange peel" feel on it

clearly001mp0.jpg

clearly005uc0.jpg

so if i use 600 wet paper, how do i have to use it, can i just wrap a pen and rub, or is there a better method like a block?

thanks in advance for the advices.

God bless!

rene

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A 9v battery isn't guaranteed to be flat and it's got a relatively small surface area. A small glass block would be a much better proposition. Something with 1/2 to 2/3 of the surface area of the headstock, otherwise it's to easy to give into temptation and concentrating in one area....

Given that's it's rattlecan paint, you should ideally let it dry for a LONG LONG time because the paint is most likely to still be partially plastic and will move over time. If you sanded it flat and buffed it to a polish and then decided to install the tuners, you'd find the bushings sinking into the finish fairly soon! Trust me....I did this with a BC Rich Mockingbird respray and had to chip out the neck plate....

Baking the headstock at a Texas temperature would speed the curing process up somewhat, but i'm a little shady on the timescales. Just my two pence worth.

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thanks to everyone! i really like the way it looks now, so i think ill forget about another coat.

i use an electric heater, its at low level but its just to keep the air warmer, is it ok? whats the best Temperature to cure it faster? 25 degree Celcius?

endy011ee7.jpg

heres the headstock, not polished yet, you can see some air dust on it but this is only external dust since the coat isnt sticky at all

endy008mu7.jpg

endy010ym2.jpg

the story is that i had some dings i wanted to take off so i ended up putting some sharpie marker to hide them, then i started hiding more and more...... to that point where the headstock was compeletly ruined and ugly. so i decided to try some stuff i learned here.

well, tell me what you guys think, its my first real refinishing.

oh and if you know it, dont forget to tell me best Temperature and Time to let it cure before stringing it up. 2 days?

thanks!

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Its enamel. I don't think I've seen Tremclad make any other type of paint. If I'm wrong please edicate me. :D Anyway, its the wrong paint to use on a guitar but what the hell. Let it cure for a couple weeks and hit the flats with 600 grit wrapped around a wooden block. Use finer grit (maybe 800 to 1200) wrapped around a foam pad on corners and curves. Then work down to 2000 grit or so and polish. You will find that the enamel paint loses its shine after a couple months and because it lays down so thick it takes a long time to harden.

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thanks, heres the Tremclad i used:

http://www.rustoleum.com/product.asp?frm_p...d=548&SBL=1

not sure if its even enamel or poly, it just says finish.

i think i will let it as it is. and no the tuners arent even sinking in the coat cause i only painted the top and sides, so only the bushings are touching the coat and i havent pushed them hard at all.

but id like to know if i should keep storing the headstock near the electric heater or not. will it help or will the cold canadian nights help it better?

all in all, cold or hot to cure faster?

thanks for help each and everyone of you.

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