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Template Router Bit Size


Mr. Preston Swift
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i'm looking to buy a template bit for my router and I don't know what would be the best cutting length and diameter and overall length to get precise and detailed route through a template. The site that i'm looking at has many available.

http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-routerbits/s...0545319_6514+47

I don't know if any of you have purchased from this site but which one would be a good one to get?

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I order from them all the time; they sell whiteside router bits, top quality stuff. As for size...whatever you want to use. My most used bit is probably the 3/4" diameter bit on a 1/2" shaft for outside work, and smaller/shorter cut depth bits for things like pickup templates. 1/4" shaft, 1/2" cut, 1/4" depth of cut is useful for sneaking up to not-very-deep template routed holes.

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i'm looking to buy a template bit for my router and I don't know what would be the best cutting length and diameter and overall length to get precise and detailed route through a template. The site that i'm looking at has many available.

http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-routerbits/s...0545319_6514+47

I don't know if any of you have purchased from this site but which one would be a good one to get?

3001 (good for pickup and other routes.)

3023 (good for routing the body shape)

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It's also a good idea to have one bit with the bearing on the top and one with it on the bottom. You may think you'll be able to get away with just one, but it wouldn't take long to be in a spot where you'd need the other.

Also, I'd suggest getting one looooong bit - the ones with the bearing next to the shank. As close to 2" as possible. This would be the main one used for the outside of the body.

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Also, I'd suggest getting one looooong bit - the ones with the bearing next to the shank. As close to 2" as possible. This would be the main one used for the outside of the body.

If you don't have one long enough, you can get away with 2 shorter ones. I use a template follower to get about halfway through the thickness of the side, then flip the guitar over and use a flush trim to take off the other half, trimming flush to the cut I just made from the template.

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I bought a 1/2" x 1/4" shank router bit with the top bearing that can be adjusted up and down to suit the depth of cut/ template thickness. I used it for the neck pocket of my Tele P bass with a simple jig I made and the result was excellent. A perfect tight joint.

I will look at a quality bottom bearing bit as the cheapo set I have, has poor quality bearings that fly to bits in short order when doing heavy work.

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First before you commit you need to know what your router will handle. If you can use 1/2" shank bits don't buy 1/4" shank bits. With 1/2" you will need to go to a 3/4" diameter bit because they don't make top bearing 1/2" bits with 1/2" shanks its impossible. Whiteside is the best for a good reason; but any brand will work as long as its sharp. I generally make two passes with a top bearing bit from the same side (yes hang the work over the edge of your work table on the 2nd pass). You will need a minimum of 1" length after the bearing assuming most bodies are within 1 3/4" deep, adjust bit lenght accordingly for your needs. I stopped using laminate bits years ago (bottom bearing) as they are generally 1/2" diameter and I prefer a larger bit. Of course if you have some very tight corners 3/4" may be too big; but that would be the exception and not the rule. I base this opinion on routing the body, I have found it works for internal routing as well. I do own many different bits and sizes (disclaimer).

A reason to use a 2" + bit would be a router table or overarm router where you control the work not the router. I have been eying the Grizzly Shop Fox overarm router for a year now. Still haven't gotten the nerve to fork over the money.

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