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Parrot/ Caribbean Burst


chris1010
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Agreed - @ScottR is currently on a seasonal break but will be around to check in sometime!

I think it will be simpler to do than you expect @chris1010, however the trick is being able to work the dyes to get the exact transitions you want with the yellow and blue. The outer part of the yellow looks like it has either had some green worked in there too (or yellow worked out) rather than being a combination of blue/yellow. Regardless, you can always make your own green with whatever blue and yellow you decide on ;-)

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That looks to me to have been done with a black dye sanded back to begin with. I would say that lemon yellow dye was applied to the center and fading to a stop a couple inches short of the edges. Blue dye was then applied full strength at the edges and fades toward the center stopping where you see the lightest green and leaving the yellow center. As Carl says you may also use a green faded into the yellow and fade the blue into that, but it is not necessary to get that look. I prefer to spray the dyes on with an airbrush to get the smoothest transition.

SR

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If you look into my thread that Buter linked to you'll see that I used green in the center instead of yellow (which I made from the blue and yellow dyes), and blue as the transition color instead of green and a reddish purple burst along the edges instead of the blue. Aside from the color substitutions the process is the same. And ignore the difference in philosophy of using straight black for a sandback color.

SR

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The blue has very very little in the way of a transition and is very very consistent. Keeping it tight like that is difficult whereas the central yellow-green is looser and more forgiving. It looks like the green is less consistent in how it intrudes to the blue, but the blue isn't affected by it. It almost looks like the yellow and green were a "normal" dyeing and the blue a sprayed burst. Weird.

Any thoughts to that effect, @ScottR? What I suggested is overly complicated but simply based on how that looks....

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My thought is the yellow went down first and literally stopped short of the edge where you see the hard blue line. You may be correct in that the yellow was wiped on. It is a tad difficult to see any subtleties in yellow dye on maple which may also account for the hard edge. Apply the blue to maple with no yellow under it and you get the blue edges and where it crosses the the yellow layer you get the green. The blue is faded toward the center to get the variance in the green. I would spray that, but it is possible to get it by wiping.

SR

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