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Need help grounding a 4-pole 5-way rotary switch


chrisdebo
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Hey guys,

I'm trying to wire a rotary switch for a H-H-H setup. I couldn't find any info on how the switch works, just examples of wiring the hot leads. I assume that ground lead numbered 0 in the middle of the switch is ground but I can't get it to work. I read I can use a multimeter to test the continuity, but wouldn't it be better to measure the power output? Thanks.

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How is it not working? The diagram looks right, but there is a lot of detail missing (I assume you left out a lot of it to make it easier to read?) so if there's another wiring fault going on that isn't shown in your sketch it isn't obvious. For example the grounding for the pickups seems to be missing, as does any detail around how the volume pots and output jack are wired.

 

6 hours ago, chrisdebo said:

I assume that ground lead numbered 0 in the middle of the switch is ground

Not ground. It should be the common output (hot) of the switch after selecting your combinations of pickups, which is how I assume you've drawn it, If this is the case it looks like it's drawn correctly, notwithstanding that it appears incomplete.

99% of the time grounds to various parts of the circuit should be continuous and unbroken.

 

6 hours ago, chrisdebo said:

I read I can use a multimeter to test the continuity, but wouldn't it be better to measure the power output?

You can, and if the wiring is already installed in the guitar you can do it, but you need to be able to strum the strings and measure the output at the same time. It also doesn't tell you if the signal you're measuring is one pickup or all three, or if there's some other noise being superimposed on to the guitar output. In which case you may as well just plug the guitar into an amp and listen to the output.

Continuity measurment provides a quick feedback that point A connects to point B without relying on the pickups being operational, which is handy when you have the guts of the guitar spilled all over your workbench while you're working on it.

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So sorry, Cortisa. I got confused about my own diagram. Yes, hot is coming from the tone pot to the 0 leads. The detail missing is because I don't have any grounds. How should this switch be grounded? That's the part I couldn't find online. I understand 3- and 5-way linear switches, but there is no doc on this rotary that I could find. Thanks for responding. Chris

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Does it need to be grounded? I don't see any part of your switching arrangement that would necessarily require part of it grounded, unless you're doing something like coil-splitting the humbuckers.

The only grounding you may want to add is for noise reduction, which would automatically occur when the switch is bolted to any shielding you may have inside the control cavity, but it's certainly not mandatory. The grounding in that case is done by the threaded shaft of the switch being in physical contact with the conductive shielding, which should already be grounded.

 

42 minutes ago, chrisdebo said:

The detail missing is because I don't have any grounds.

Not sure I follow. All of your circuit requires grounds at various points otherwise parts of it won't work. Each pickup requires a ground, each volume pot requires a ground, each tone pot requires a ground etc

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generally speaking... your pickups should be grounded to the pots and the rotary just grounds itself through the physical contact with the control cavity shield.  even a 5 way switch doesn't necc have to be grounded explicitly.  if you don't need a ground connection on the switch (to say - split buckers for something) then you don't need it.

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I employ a central ground busbar not individual solder to potentiometer case. Busbar (copper slug) grounded in two places for redundant. All grounded component connected to it. Use of drill and tap, not solder. Mechanical fasteners. Component easy to remove replace repair no wire cuts. No poison gas from solder.  I work for high voltage industry for decades apply methods to low voltage also. Potentiometer case weak and contain of delicate instrument not good for heat ground or common purpose!

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  • 2 months later...

This website full of help and good use. Guitar persons are of good humor want to help with problems. A few perhaps not so much, but no person big desire to keep secrets. Not true inside many other hobby.  Guitar persons are intelligent artistic person of sensitive and taste. Even so when we run or jump or throw thing or curse or drink private or public or smoke upon stage or mock the audience. Maybe to kiss unknown girls.

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