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Tremolo Info Page


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*cough*Parker Fly Trem*cough*

:D

Not a terrible page, and definitely a good start. But "tremolo" and "vibrato" are WAY OLDER than the site depicts.

Also, both terms are correct, in their own way....

Vibrato: n.- A tremulous or pulsating effect produced in an instrumental or vocal tone by minute and rapid variations in pitch.

Tremolo: n.- A tremulous effect produced by rapid repetition of a single tone.

...bringing us to....

Tremulous: adj.- Marked by trembling, quivering, or shaking.

Both work when it comes to music (esp. guitar playing), but "vibrato" gets you results quicker.

We can all thank Mr. Leo Fender for incorrecting us.

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Also, both terms are correct, in their own way....

Well actually musically speaking vibrato is variation in pitch, whilst tremolo is variation in volume. Thus tremolo has been the wrong name for the trem... It should have been called vibrato.

What about call it always whammy bar or wang bar or...

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Also, both terms are correct, in their own way....

Well actually musically speaking vibrato is variation in pitch, whilst tremolo is variation in volume. Thus tremolo has been the wrong name for the trem... It should have been called vibrato.

What about call it always whammy bar or wang bar or...

Errm, no, tremolo is variation in pitch too. I just had my music class like 2 hours ago, we revised that concept today.

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I'd prefer it to be called a vibrato unit, as well, but at the end of the day, Leo has forever altered the language and tremolo is now accepted for describing this pitch fluctuation on a guitar.

Such is the dynamic nature of language. :D

The site's not the most brilliant one I've seen, but it had info on it that I figured some people might find handy (the Wonderbar, for example). That's about it. :D

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Errm, no, tremolo is variation in pitch too. I just had my music class like 2 hours ago, we revised that concept today.

No, you manky Scots git :D (Monty Python reference)

Tremolo is used (incorrectly IMHO) by some to mean variation in pitch only when we're talking about the voice. Not when we're talking about stringed instruments like violin or our beloved guitar, where the correct term is vibrato. Tremolo is variation in volume or also (originally, I believe) the rapid repetition of the same note (thus "tremolo picking") or of two different notes (fingered tremolo when playing violin).

When playing violin or guitar, though, due to the physical qualities of the strings it is quite difficult/impossible to have the one purely without the other.

Oh, and while we're at it, I may point out quite frankly that A# is not the same as Bb. :D

But I may point out quite fairly that the terms have been greatly misunderstood and mixed in the last one and a half centuries, so that confusion is programmed, and that I am not really willing to start a tedious thread about this because I have already once and it was lengthy to say the least.

In fact, I prefer to call the trem trem simply because Leo (expletive deleted by Mod Team - consider this a pre-warning) it up at that time and called his invention tremolo. I do not call America India though, despite the wrong name given by Columbus.

May you just tell me where you got music class? is a classical music academy? I hope not...

Edited by lovekraft
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In fact, I prefer to call the trem trem simply because Leo (expletive deleted by Mod Team - consider this a pre-warning) it up

Oh, you cannot say that word on a major television in the US? Most american movies and hip-hop songs that get exported have that word in it...

Interesting article from the Guardian (kids don't read this)

And psss... Use the search button and search for bad words and you'll find....

Well I'll go to sleep now.

Oh, and I am not debating. I am a moderator myself on a forum and two mailing lists...

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I just showed this thread to a buddy of mine who's ex-Berklee. Here's his quote:

"Vibrato is pitch. Tremolo is volume. It's universally accepted that a tremolo system on a guitar is incrorrectly named- and whothef*** cares to dicsuss it on the 'net with strangers?"

LMAO.

BTW- Columbus didn't name America. A German clergyman-scholar named Martin Waldseemüller did:

http://geography.about.com/cs/historicalgeog/a/amerigo.htm

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I just showed this thread to a buddy of mine who's ex-Berklee.  Here's his quote:

"Vibrato is pitch.  Tremolo is volume.  It's universally accepted that a tremolo system on a guitar is incrorrectly named- and whothef*** cares to dicsuss it on the 'net with strangers?"

I gotta agree about the universal acceptance... I think it's pretty common knowledge that it's a misnomer, but that doesn't change its inclusion into modern vocabulary. :D

As for the rest-- obviously he knew that you were the one that brought it up. <laff> Some people don't understand forum culture, but that's OK. Luckily my girlfriend uses forums too, or I'd feel like a lamer telling her about forum-related stuff. <chuckle>

Greg

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BTW- Columbus didn't name America.  A German clergyman-scholar named Martin Waldseemüller did:

http://geography.about.com/cs/historicalgeog/a/amerigo.htm

Columbus was searching for another way to reach Asia because all the spices and gold and stuff to bring back from there. But, unlike anyone else, he started to go westward. When he reached land, he thought he's in Asia now. So he called the locals Indians too.

I dunno, I don't remember the exact story but yea, that's about how it goes.

I don't know about you but the strat tremolo actually does tremolo along with vibrato. When you bend it down, it also goes a tad quieter, then going back to normal position, it regains the loudness. Could anyone explain it physically? I've got to run now.

----------

Jimbo

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i've got a 7 year old guitar student that said it sounded "wobbley" the first time he heard me use a bigsby..just sayin' :D

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I gotta agree about the universal acceptance... I think it's pretty common knowledge that it's a misnomer, but that doesn't change its inclusion into modern vocabulary.

well i was not aware of it.so i guess i just learned something.

hooray for me.

mr. churchyard...you are quite well spoken(written?).english is not your first language?

but no...the f-word is not permitted here or on american t.v.

yet.but i think when our generation runs the show that may change :D

personally i find insults to be much more fun when done in non profane terms...

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well i was not aware of it.so i guess i just learned something.

hooray for me.

mr. churchyard...you are quite well spoken(written?).english is not your first language?

but no...the f-word is not permitted here or on american t.v.

yet.but i think when our generation runs the show that may change :D

personally i find insults to be much more fun when done in non profane terms...

No it isn't. My first languages - as I am from "mixed" origins, being half Italian and half German - are Italian and German. But I am glad you regard my English as well spoken, because I am very very fond of the English language and have learnt and read much. You may find many words which would be regarded as archaisms I guess, because I just love Shakespearean English ;-)

So, no "**** the ****ing ****ers"-language in here. Fine, that's ok by me :D

Edited by Mr.Churchyard
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I just showed this thread to a buddy of mine who's ex-Berklee.  Here's his quote:

"Vibrato is pitch.  Tremolo is volume.  It's universally accepted that a tremolo system on a guitar is incrorrectly named- and whothef*** cares to dicsuss it on the 'net with strangers?"

Just to assure everybody, the buddy he refers to is not me. :D

And the lot of you who does not universally accept that tremolo bars are vibratos, off and :D

Just kidding.

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Columbus was searching for another way to reach Asia because all the spices and gold and stuff to bring back from there. But, unlike anyone else, he started to go westward. When he reached land, he thought he's in Asia now. So he called the locals Indians too.

----------

Jimbo

Not west but east, and he thought he was on India, and he called then Indios, in spanish, then the Anglos used the same term but in english to call the american natives Indians.

On none of his trips he set foot on north america, the closer he got was on the 1st and he came thru the Bahamas. and on the 4th he landed on Mexico.

Sorry for the little class, this is one of the classes that we (PR) have to take in elementary and high school, not like the states that they take Social Studies lightly.

And who cares what the thing actualy does, we all know it as tremolo or vibrato, who cares!

Just pass me the wammy bar, and lets play.

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