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Removing One Fret - Argh


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my first suggestion is to take a close look at the fret pulling plyers offered on stewart mcdonald's website and then go to your local hardware store and find the same thing in their tool area. they'll have flat ground jaws and you should be able to pick up a pair for about half price. check and see if they have a bargain bin of chinese cheapie tools. i found some in the one at my local store for $3.00.

if that won't work for you there's one other thing you can do. i'll likely get flamed for this but take an ice pick or small finish nail. place it on the end of the fret on the headstock side of the tang. tap lightly with a small hammer and the fret should start popping up. keep tapping until it's out. the real drawback to this is the likelyhood of chipping out some of the fretboard right next to the fret. especially if the fretboard is ebony.

now, don't do the icepick thing until someone else comes along and answers this question. there my be some other acceptable methods that i'm not aware of.

good luck.

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Hi I have to remove the top fret of a ebony fretboard and cannot afford to spend $25 at the moment for a fret remover - is there a way to get just one fret out without one? A locking nut is going in... maybe I could carefully dremel out the back of the fret to the tang depth? or something?

Kiira

this is the way i did it if i understand your problem. just take a razor blade and slowly,carefully insert it at the end of the fret (between the fret and the fingerboard) and gently pry it up, moving the blade towards the other end of the fret. ebony is hard and kinda brittle.so dont get ahead of yourself or you WILL chip your fretboard where the tang anchors come out of the slot. you did not mention what kind of guitar you are repairing. and i am not sure what you mean by "top fret" nut end or bridge end? if i can be of any more assistance, email barefoot ed at edslides13@yahoo.com. good luck

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Hi I have to remove the top fret of a ebony fretboard and cannot afford to spend $25 at the moment for a fret remover - is there a way to get just one fret out without one? A locking nut is going in... maybe I could carefully dremel out the back of the fret to the tang depth? or something?

Kiira

I'm not sure I'm understand why a fret has to come out to put in a locking nut? I can understand taking out a regular nut and replacing it with routing and drilling for the locking nut, but why a fret..as someone else asked, what sort of guitar is this?

01lg_clean.jpg

Edited by Gorecki
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You do realize that removing that fret and placing the nut there will shorten the scale length, right?

:D Yes that is the plan,,,, 251/2" scale to very close to 24". I know it's a trifle goofy but it beats buying a new warmoth Jaguar neck - this is going on a frankenstrat which is all kinda experimenat anyway.

Thank you every one for the great suggestions.

Kiira

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If that's true you will likely not be able to get the guitar to tune. Not only the scale length will be altered, but the distance of each fret should also be alter so..you'll never get the guitar to play in tune up the fretboard if you do that.

yes it alters the scale length... it's the equivalent of putting a capo on the first fret permanently. :D

see... I'm removing the fret nearest the nut... not the one nearest the body.

Kiira

Edited by uglogirl
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You do realize that removing that fret and placing the nut there will shorten the scale length, right?

:D Yes that is the plan,,,, 251/2" scale to very close to 24". I know it's a trifle goofy but it beats buying a new warmoth Jaguar neck - this is going on a frankenstrat which is all kinda experimenat anyway.

Thank you every one for the great suggestions.

Kiira

Your fret spacing will not be correct if you alter the scale length and re-locate one fret. If your goal is to change the scale length you will need to change the fret spacing. A new fretboard(is probably the most sensable approch), relocation of the nut(may look odd) and or relocate the bridge. I am having a bit of trouble understanding exactly what you are trying to do. Maybe one quick message to clear up exactly what your goal is.

(edit before post);

So you are going to have a 25-1/2" scale. You will just lose one half step of scale. Certainly odd, but if that is the goal. Be mindful of the strings behind the nut. You may have issues with the angle to the tuners( depending on how you modify the fretboard behind the nut).

Peace,Rich

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B)

If I were you I'd take a long hard look at what I'm about to do ... then hit myself in the head with a tack hammer.

:D:D

Uglogirl--you have at least one other playable guitar, right?

If that's the case, then sure, go for it...could be fun, as long as the neck's expendable.

Won't your plan affect the intonation though?

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Hi I have to remove the top fret of a ebony fretboard and cannot afford to spend $25 at the moment for a fret remover - is there a way to get just one fret out without one? A locking nut is going in... maybe I could carefully dremel out the back of the fret to the tang depth? or something?

Kiira

I'm not sure I'm understand why a fret has to come out to put in a locking nut? I can understand taking out a regular nut and replacing it with routing and drilling for the locking nut, but why a fret..as someone else asked, what sort of guitar is this?

01lg_clean.jpg

i think i get your vision. here are two suggestions. first. if you are not gonna be happy with a very cobbled up lookimg guitar, your only alternative is to relplace the fret board with a new one.sslotted to a 24" scale length if you go this route, remember, you will HAVE to move your bridge closer to the nut,(the distance from the nut to the twelfth fret should for all practical purposes, be the same distance as the twelfth fret to the bridge saddle, before factoring in the individual strings intonation, which will vary if you use a set of strings that are not of the same guage as those on the guitar when the intonation was initially set ) option two is to go balls to the wall with the frankengibson concept. (i noticed a clue to its pedigree) it will not tune correctly. but if you tune down a half stepand pretend ypu are using a first fret capo you might be able to fake it with modified finger positions. that will leave plenty of space between the zero fret and first fret position on the neck to put your locking nut. let us know what you do. i love experiments that involve guitar dna manipulation. ..................................................................keep slidin

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This sounds like a disaster. As you probably know the "exit" of the strings on the tuner side of the Floyd nut are quite a bit lower than on the other side of the nut (side closer to the body). So, I think that would mean your strings are going to be "bottomed out" on the fret-board surface between the locking nut and the tuners, or probably worse then that.

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In theory, your idea is possible.

Yes, it's just like placing a capo on the first fret.

However, you're not changing the actual scale length, and there could be issues with the strings hitting the fretboard on the headstock side.

Why do you want to remove one fret and add a locking nut?

Once again, you're not changing the scale length.

If you plan to do this, and then place the bridge at "the new scale length", you'll be in for a surprise...

The fret positions are based on a certain scale length, and there is nothing you can do about that.

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I'm so confused when reading this thread. The only thing I can think of is she has a guitar with a zero fret.

Are you trying to convert a 25.5 scale to a 24? If so, I'd like to know why? It wouldn't be worth it and you'd have to replace the whole fretboard unless you want a lot of wood filler. If you want a 24 inch scale you're going to have to shift the bridge up 1.5 inches towards the nut. Then you're going to have to replace the entire fretboard. In the end it's so much work that it's probably better to buy the warmoth neck or the guitar you're aiming for, unless this guitar you are doing it on is just a guitar for projects.

-Jamie

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Well, I think she pretty much said it's a way of beating the system, and not having to buy a real 24" scale guitar, but maybe she doesn't know there have have some pretty cheap and decent 24" scale guitars made in the not too distant past, like some 24" scale Fender squires.

I think if she goes through with this idea it's going to end up being more expensive, because the guitar is probably going to be a kooky mess and then she'll still have to buy a real 24" scale guitar to get what she's after.

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[

So you are going to have a 25-1/2" scale. You will just lose one half step of scale. Certainly odd, but if that is the goal. Be mindful of the strings behind the nut. You may have issues with the angle to the tuners( depending on how you modify the fretboard behind the nut).

Peace,Rich

That's the main problem actually.... I'm going to mill or file the bottom of the locking nut flat so the strings will exit parallel to the fretboard.

Kiira

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Well, I think she pretty much said it's a way of beating the system, and not having to buy a real 24" scale guitar, but maybe she doesn't know there have have some pretty cheap and decent 24" scale guitars made in the not too distant past, like some 24" scale Fender squires.

I think if she goes through with this idea it's going to end up being more expensive, because the guitar is probably going to be a kooky mess and then she'll still have to buy a real 24" scale guitar to get what she's after.

I have 2 24" guitars already and have been playing them so long that I like my electrics to have a 24" scale. I have a frankencaster with a refretted jaguar neck on it.... I got the body unrouted and had it routed for the Floyd 1 1/2" closer to the neck end.

This guitar is meant to be cheap. I have no other guitars with humbuckers so I wanted a kind of shred/metal guitar to play around with. I got the body for free and modified it from a backrouted Floyd (yech!) to a Kahler by glueing in a maple block and lots of sanding ... you can't tell unless you get closer than 3 feet. :D It has a clear stained flame maple top that I dyed a weird shrimpish/pink/orange color. lol. It's not ugly just different.

I'll post pictures when I'm done. Here's my jagu-caster which has since been changed to a cream color with 3 Lindy Fralins.

http://www.2tough.com/~kiira/rec/cool.html

thanks,

Kiira

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I have a frankencaster with a refretted jaguar neck on it.... I got the body unrouted and had it routed for the Floyd 1 1/2" closer to the neck end.

The problem is that you cannot take a a body for a 24" scale, and put a 25 1/2" scale neck on it. Just moving the nut closer towards the bridge (closer to the 24" scale) doesn't change the position of the frets.

While the scale "generally" refers to the distance between the nut and the bridge, the fret position also has to match. You cannot have 24" between the nut and the bridge, if the distance between the nut and 12th fret isn't 12".

But you're not really taking any advice from anyone here, so all I can say is:

Good luck!

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The problem is that you cannot take a a body for a 24" scale, and put a 25 1/2" scale neck on it.

I'm not doing that though. On my first jagucaster I put a 24" scaleneck on a strat body which had been routed properly to give the correct scale and intonation.. this meant that the bridge was moved up 1 1/2". Look at the pickguard and you will see how deep the Floyd is set into it compared to a real strat.

Just moving the nut closer towards the bridge (closer to the 24" scale) doesn't change the position of the frets.

While the scale "generally" refers to the distance between the nut and the bridge, the fret position also has to match. You cannot have 24" between the nut and the bridge, if the distance between the nut and 12th fret isn't 12".

If the top fret is "removed" so to speak from a 25 1/2" scale neck the distace from the 12th fret to the brifge is not altered at all. Like I said... what I'm doing is adding a locking nut somewhat like a permanent capo - the guitar will be tuned to E and the effect is to make a 24" scale guitar since the first fret on a strat guitar is very close to 1 1/2" from the nut. .

But you're not really taking any advice from anyone here, so all I can say is:

That's not true, yes I am. I got the fret off last night using the razor blade method :D I didn't ask about scales or how my guitar would look or any of that... I asked how to get a fret off. I know already that my strategy will result in a properly intonated guitar if my workmanship is adequate.

kiitos,

Kiira

Edited by uglogirl
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[

So you are going to have a 25-1/2" scale. You will just lose one half step of scale. Certainly odd, but if that is the goal. Be mindful of the strings behind the nut. You may have issues with the angle to the tuners( depending on how you modify the fretboard behind the nut).

Peace,Rich

That's the main problem actually.... I'm going to mill or file the bottom of the locking nut flat so the strings will exit parallel to the fretboard.

Kiira

Do you plan on lowering the fretboard height behind the locking nut? If the strings run parallel to the board, you must be matching the angle between the back of the nut to the tuners. Sounds like you have a plan and are looking at this area. Good luck with the mod.

Peace,Rich

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[

Do you plan on lowering the fretboard height behind the locking nut? If the strings run parallel to the board, you must be matching the angle between the back of the nut to the tuners. Sounds like you have a plan and are looking at this area. Good luck with the mod.

Peace,Rich

Yes I'll have to make it a little lower but I can't take too much away because of the truss rod adjustment. I could also use a string hold down, yanno that bar thingy, to give some angle downfrom the nut when I am tuning prior to tightening down the llock.

Thanks :D

Kiira

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That's the main problem actually.... I'm going to mill or file the bottom of the locking nut flat so the strings will exit parallel to the fretboard.

Kiira

Is this going to be a 'real deal' high quality floyd locking nut ? If so, Have fun "milling" that *case-hardened steel*. Even carbide bits often get trashed when just trying to modify the holes on those things.

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