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Truss Rods<- That's Right... Plural!


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I have heard talk of people using two truss rods in their bass necks as opposed to 1 and carbon fiber reinforcements. I am wondering, if a guy was to use 2 truss rods, how would he go about doing it.

Theoretically the man has a 6 string bass neck, 2'' at nut, 3 1/4'' at 24th fret. When using 2 truss rods, he would router the channels to each side of the center of the neck, correct? how much distance would he put between the rods?

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Two trussrods is unneeded on a 6-string bass. If you're using maple along with 2 carbon rods, it's more than strong enough to handle 6-strings. When you get to a wider neck, it is required to have two truss rods to evenly adjust the relief on the neck.

But regarding your question - yes, I would route them out next to the center of the neck. But I would route the channel to where it follows the taper of the neck.

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I two would route them parallel to the neck's taper. However, I don't think they're needed, some companies do use them... like my Rickenbacker 4001 has two rods in it... and it's a 4 string :S Never understood that one, but oh well.

I do agree with Jon though, maple with carbon fiber rods and one truss is plenty strong.

Chris

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I two would route them parallel to the neck's taper. However, I don't think they're needed, some companies do use them... like my Rickenbacker 4001 has two rods in it... and it's a 4 string :S Never understood that one, but oh well.

I do agree with Jon though, maple with carbon fiber rods and one truss is plenty strong.

Chris

CHris and Jon as well,

I'm not sure I understand the reason for following the taper other than the distance between the rods? Other than a slight offset ( due to taper) pressure on the neck, it is a lateral force against the the grain.. Perpendicula r to the grain would be the best choice????? Meaning inline and side by side would be the choice? So could you expand on this ???????????????

Thanks Mike??????

Just I would like like to understand this with more than just preference?

Edited by MiKro
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Grain isn't in mind - it's consistent relief distributed amongst the neck. I suppose whether the truss rods are parallel to one another, or parallel to the taper wouldn't affect a great deal, but about all the wide necks (7+ string basses, 2 3/4"+ wide nuts) have had truss rods done in the parallel to the taper fashion. It's all about consistency.

Edited by Jon
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Grain isn't in mind - it's consistent relief distributed amongst the neck. I suppose whether the truss rods are parallel to one another, or parallel to the taper wouldn't affect a great deal, but about all the wide necks (7+ string basses, 2 3/4"+ wide nuts) have had truss rods done in the parallel to the taper fashion. It's all about consistency.

Okay I'll buy that!!! Thanks Jon!

BTW things here are going better than expected!!! Just an FYI for you.

MK

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I think there may be an argument for two rods (or cf bars) placed parallel to the taper actually helping to resist twisting in the neck compared to having both the rods running sort of down the centre. I'm not sure about this - just a gut feeling i have.

Having said that i still put all my reinforcement parallel to the centre because its a much easier process and with proper wood selection twisting isnt a problem.

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I always put in my CF roughly following the neck taper (slightly splayed). It's not hard to do (set up an edge guide, and you only need to measure the distance between router base edge and router bit centre once). Haven't bothered using an actual edge following setup on a guitar neck for ages now; just make sure you move the router in the right direction (remember: routers go LEFT, so relative to the direction you feed your router, the guide should always be on the LEFT side), and you'll get straight and tru results.

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Okay I'll buy that!!! Thanks Jon!

BTW things here are going better than expected!!! Just an FYI for you.

MK

Great to hear!

WezV - I think the multiple laminates in a wide neck would help the most against the neck twisting. I have seen one extended range bass ever made from a 1 piece neck, most often they're 5 laminates or more. Wouldn't the carbon rods being routed parallel to the taper have the most consistent strength? Or is this a pointless debate? Seems like regardless of what the person is doing, 2 or 3 carbon rods, 2 truss rods with hard woods will provide more than enough strength for any amount of strings.

03.jpg

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Or is this a pointless debate? Seems like regardless of what the person is doing, 2 or 3 carbon rods, 2 truss rods with hard woods will provide more than enough strength for any amount of strings.

thats the way i generally see it for most guitars and basses but its definately worth a little more thought with beasts like that one above. If i was making that bass i would have been tempted to laminate the neck but two truss-rods set parallel to the taper is definately the right choice for a neck that wide - probably with two extra cf bars in between. I still havnt ventured into the realm of the ERB so i can afford to not worry about it on my own builds just yet.

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Yes, a little more. But I encourage people to look up ERB's regarding this topic for information. There really are a lot of people out there worried about wood neck strength. The consensus - when in doubt, use carbon fiber rods.

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I'm fully aware of the fact that CF and a dual action rod are generally total and complete overkill. But I like the consistent stiffness and even tone it seems to provide. Wood's plenty strong stuff, even 'weaker' wood like Mahogany ('weaker' compared to maple, but way more stable...)

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I'm fully aware of the fact that CF and a dual action rod are generally total and complete overkill. But I like the consistent stiffness and even tone it seems to provide. Wood's plenty strong stuff, even 'weaker' wood like Mahogany ('weaker' compared to maple, but way more stable...)

Yeah, i am using a two-way truss rod and dual cf bars on most things now - mainly for tonal benefits of a stiffer neck. Although i did find on my recent bass the neck was one of the most flexible i have ever built even with 3 laminations, a two way truss rod and dual cf bars. I hate to think how much it would have bowed without the CF bars and truss rod - i was glad of the overkill on that bass. Its stable and straight now its settled in but you can still get a nice vibrato by pulling back on the neck

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I'm fully aware of the fact that CF and a dual action rod are generally total and complete overkill. But I like the consistent stiffness and even tone it seems to provide. Wood's plenty strong stuff, even 'weaker' wood like Mahogany ('weaker' compared to maple, but way more stable...)

Yeah, i am using a two-way truss rod and dual cf bars on most things now - mainly for tonal benefits of a stiffer neck. Although i did find on my recent bass the neck was one of the most flexible i have ever built even with 3 laminations, a two way truss rod and dual cf bars. I hate to think how much it would have bowed without the CF bars and truss rod - i was glad of the overkill on that bass. Its stable and straight now its settled in but you can still get a nice vibrato by pulling back on the neck

Heh. Go figure.

Funniest moment for me: the floppiest neck I've built (to my mind) is the one on that red guitar from about a year ago (or whatever it was). Long, thin neck, no lams, mahogany, felt 'floppy' to me. First comment I got from a strat player (good one, too) used to his 70's fender neck allowing him neck-pulling vibratos: 'man, this neck is stiff!'. It's all very relative.

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