Skyjerk

Newcomer build "22 Magnum"

142 posts in this topic

28 minutes ago, ScottR said:

Beautiful job. I can't wait to see the pooped red top.

SR

LOL. Pretty sure I said "popped"

 

I dont think I'd care much for a pooped top :hyper

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Hahaha! So you did. <_<

I must have been the pooped one.

SR

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This is such a clean little beauty. Nice work!

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Just a couple more pix of this build, and I made the cavity covers yesterday. I used 3-ply pickguard material even though no plys will show because it was thick enough and rigid enough for what I wanted.

the fit is perfect, couldn't be happier 

i used a random orbital sander and a 500 grit disk to take the gloss off and make it a matte finish because, well, I don't like gloss covers :-)

 

22mag-tall17.jpg

 

22magfinp18.jpg

 

22magfinp17.jpg

 

22magfinp21.jpg

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Damn, that looks nice. I even like the furnishings!

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32 minutes ago, Prostheta said:

Damn, that looks nice. I even like the furnishings!

Thanks!

 

after I get a finish on it the strap buttons (Dunlop strap locks) will be replaced with black ones to match the rest of the hardware. The neck pickup will also be swapped, although the replacement will look identical. The one in it now is a SD Jazz, but the final pup will be an SD Pearly Gates

i just had those ones on hand

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That is definitely a beauty alright.

I imagine it will be tough not to risk dings, dirt and grime from playing it before it gets dress in popped red attire.

SR

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31 minutes ago, ScottR said:

That is definitely a beauty alright.

I imagine it will be tough not to risk dings, dirt and grime from playing it before it gets dress in popped red attire.

SR

Lol. Tough is right. I'm actually bringing it to rehearsal tonite and will play it "in the white" as I've heard some folks call it.

the top is dirty anyway from when I was sanding the headstock veneer and the back, and it needs a final sanding all around anyway before it gets lacquer. That said, I don't want to take too many chances, so tonite will be its only jam till it's all done. 

Main reason is that I REALLY like the bridge pickup and want to demo it for my co-guitar player since he, like so many of us, are always looking for that tone that really blows our dresses up ;-)

 

its a Seymour Duncan TB-16 59/Custom hybrid and damn it sounds good. A lot more mids punch on it. It sounds real beefy and crunchy but cuts great as it's got plenty of highs as well and the harmonics just pour out of it.

Its a medium output passive and so it pairs really well with the Pup that'll go in the neck. The pearly gates is a vintage output PAF tone also with more mid punch than the jazz or 59 neck pups ive used on other builds. TheWish I'd found this pup sooner :-)

yes, I like seymour Duncan  pups a little ;-)

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Super cool build man.  I just joined today, but have poured over every page of your build this evening.  I'm more of a boatbuilder than a luthier, but the art and technology overlaps considerably.  I love your holy galahad.  Not knowing about one of those, I just mounted a biscuit joiner blade onto my 4" angle grinder to hog out and shape inside curves.  And boy, do I share your trepidation about the freaking danger of it. I never got bit by it, but I really hated using it.  

I might actually have a helpful tip for you, although your professional abilities shown prove that your current method might be best.  One of the coolest tools I have is a hand held drum sander similar to the one in the picture for smoothing out inside curves after roughing out (you didn't show how you smoothed the wood after your Galahad).  The one in the pic below is my 3" DIA drum sander in which I added a "handle" which is a 1" DIA aluminum pipe mounted via bearings onto a 5/16" threaded rod shaft.  But the one I am referring to is my huge 6" x 11" pneumatic drum in which I mounted a through shaft of a machined steel axle with the same "handle" made from pipe and bearings.  It just chucks into any good milwaukee drill and you can shape any inside curve with the graceful smoothness of a baby's bottom.  

Looking forward to seeing the rest of your progress.  And yes, I share your preference of epoxy for inlays vs CA.  No brainer.      

1-27-pwrcarving.jpg

1-27-drumsand.jpg

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12 hours ago, StratsRdivine said:

Super cool build man.  I just joined today, but have poured over every page of your build this evening.  I'm more of a boatbuilder than a luthier, but the art and technology overlaps considerably.  I love your holy galahad.  Not knowing about one of those, I just mounted a biscuit joiner blade onto my 4" angle grinder to hog out and shape inside curves.  And boy, do I share your trepidation about the freaking danger of it. I never got bit by it, but I really hated using it.  

I might actually have a helpful tip for you, although your professional abilities shown prove that your current method might be best.  One of the coolest tools I have is a hand held drum sander similar to the one in the picture for smoothing out inside curves after roughing out (you didn't show how you smoothed the wood after your Galahad).  The one in the pic below is my 3" DIA drum sander in which I added a "handle" which is a 1" DIA aluminum pipe mounted via bearings onto a 5/16" threaded rod shaft.  But the one I am referring to is my huge 6" x 11" pneumatic drum in which I mounted a through shaft of a machined steel axle with the same "handle" made from pipe and bearings.  It just chucks into any good milwaukee drill and you can shape any inside curve with the graceful smoothness of a baby's bottom.  

Looking forward to seeing the rest of your progress.  And yes, I share your preference of epoxy for inlays vs CA.  No brainer.      

 

Heya "Strats"

first off let me just say say that I agree with your name. Strats are my first love. I've built 3 so far and will be building a 4th starting in a couple weeks. Olympic white with maple neck and maple fretboard. Going non-traditional with the pups though. Gonna throw a trio of Seymour Duncan hot rails in there. I've got the vintage Strat tone covered with my last one. I have a build thread for it on my web page...

 

http://www.addictguitars.com/?page_id=2129

 

secondly, thanks for the tips. I like your sander a lot. I can think of a hundred ways to use one. I'm going to have to work on getting one :-).

It'll never replace the Galahad though. That's one bad-ass tool. I don't really feel any fear of it. Just respect for what it could do if mis-handled.

cheers and welcome,

chris

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I see the 1st and  6th strings too close to the edge of the fretboard, I had the same problem in one of my builds, still playable but a couple of mm more makes the difference.

Great work BTW, I love your guitars.

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13 minutes ago, psikoT said:

I see the 1st and  6th strings too close to the edge of the fretboard, I had the same problem in one of my builds, still playable but a couple of mm more makes the difference.

Great work BTW, I love your guitars.

I guess this is pretty much a personal preference thing. This is exactly as I planned it. I allow 1/8" on either side. there are no issues with the string falling off the edge of the fret :)

Bear in mind that a closeup like some of these will cause perspective distortion that will make the strings appear closer to the edge than they really are since the POV is essentially a single eye centered on the body and thus you are looking outward from that point. If I took a photo this close up directly over the bass E it would look just fine while the treble E would appear to be off the edge of the fretboard, and vice versa :)

 

Heres a different perspective...in this case the POV is slightly above dead center on the board so it looks like theres room on the bass side, but the treble side appears closer to the edge

22mag-finpix18.jpg

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Sorry, I'm a lil bit paranoid with that lately... :)  

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3 minutes ago, psikoT said:

Sorry, I'm a lil bit paranoid with that lately... :)  

I hear ya. In this case all I need to do to avoid an issue like that is plan ahead :)

 

The string spacing is predetermined at each end by the locking nut and the  Floyd Rose bridge itself since those are not adjustable. As long as my neck template is the right width, (and I dont have some kind of seizure while sanding), its almost impossible to mess it up.

Its a bit different when I cut my own nut like with my 22 Specials. With those I have to be a lot more careful :)

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16 minutes ago, psikoT said:

Sorry, I'm a lil bit paranoid with that lately... :)  

and holy cow! I just looked at your 7-string 2013 GOTM/GOTY winner. Thats one absolutely gorgeous guitar :hyper

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On 1/9/2017 at 1:48 AM, StratsRdivine said:

1-27-pwrcarving.jpg

1-27-drumsand.jpg

 

The portable hand drum sander in the second photo is a very neat idea. It adequately offsets the madness of the first one. <_<

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11 minutes ago, Prostheta said:

 

The portable hand drum sander in the second photo is a very neat idea. It adequately offsets the madness of the first one. <_<

Yeah. The first one looks like you are using an Evinrude outboard boat engine to carve the wood ^_^

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Carvin' like Roger Moore's boat chase in Man The The Golden Gun! <_<

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23 hours ago, Prostheta said:

 

The portable hand drum sander in the second photo is a very neat idea. It adequately offsets the madness of the first one. <_<

So remember I told you all about my big one?  You know, my big fat one?  You know size matters in this case right?  

Finally shot it since it was chucked into my POS drill press.  One of the best tools I have.  The 6" DIA x 9" inflateable drum is designed to be mounted onto an expensive, heavy, stationary tool, but I was able to buy just the drum itself, then ran the shaft through it for hand holding (even that sounds bad).    

Works great even on smoothing compound concave inside surfaces (dished) if you slip the abrasive sleeve over the outside edge for side swipe movement.  Since many guitars have those inside dished surfaces, I thought you might like that feature.     

 

Big drum sander.JPG

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21 minutes ago, StratsRdivine said:

So remember I told you all about my big one?  You know, my big fat one?  You know size matters in this case right?  

Finally shot it since it was chucked into my POS drill press.  One of the best tools I have.  The 6" DIA x 9" inflateable drum is designed to be mounted onto an expensive, heavy, stationary tool, but I was able to buy just the drum itself, then ran the shaft through it for hand holding (even that sounds bad).    

Works great even on smoothing compound concave inside surfaces (dished) if you slip the abrasive sleeve over the outside edge for side swipe movement.  Since many guitars have those inside dished surfaces, I thought you might like that feature.     

 

Big drum sander.JPG

lol. you do indeed have a big one. I feel very inadequate ^_^

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On December 13, 2016 at 9:13 AM, Skyjerk said:

Agreed. Wish I could claim I came up with the concept, but I just stole the idea from another builders video that I saw :)

 

On December 13, 2016 at 9:13 AM, Skyjerk said:

Agreed. Wish I could claim I came up with the concept, but I just stole the idea from another builders video that I saw :)

Both of these jigs are great ideas, and they work great. I use similar jigs, and as Skyjerk was saying, you can find on you-tube a couple videos on both of these jigs. There use to be a guy on the forums that built and sold the same jig for doing the fretboard radius, but I haven't seen him around in a while. Also what I have found that worked out well for me was, I ended up picking up this mini tablesaw, they have them for doing hobbies and I think Ryobi sells one. I ended up getting mine at harbor freight and they sell a 4" saw blade for that in the thinner size. I think mine is .022" or somewhere in that neighborhood.i set it up for cutting fret slots basically the same way Skyjerk did and it works great. I'm in the process of modifying my jig right now so I can cut fret slots for multi-scale fretboards. And they take up very little space as well as they are relatively cheap, I think I paid $45 for the saw.

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Fantastic thread! Once I started it I couldn't put it down until the end. First of all congratulations on celebrating your recent anniversary, I also reached a milestone in my recovery last year when on July 3rd I celebrated 10 yrs. of good clean healthy sober living. I also recently came across this forum, so I'm  a newbie or maybe a transplant. I used to spend a lot of time hanging around  motorcycle building forums (another weakness of mine). I have a question or two for you if you don't mind, I was wondering what method you use to press your frets into your fretboard, are you using a caul on a drillpress or do you use the luthier hammer ( the one with shot in the hammer head) to beat them in like Ben Crowe does? I've always used my drillpress but recently I caught a video of Ben doing it with a hammer and that seemed to work very well. I was always afraid of causing damage using a hammer. I also couldn't help notice that you must be an avid you-tube watcher like I am. Its amazing what a great learning tool it is! I've picked up a ton of great guitar building tricks. Well I'm excited to see what you come up with for the guitars finish, and I'll keep an eye out for your future builds. I see your also a Midwesterner like myself. I live in Nw Ohio. So that gives us both plenty of building time during winter months of course. Oh, also one more thing. How did you do the lettering that you put on the trust rod cover. I think that really looks great, I have recently been trying to get together a set up to print my own headstock logos, I want to be able to Change them so they can be different on each guitar, like color and size and maybe change the wording  but I'm having a difficult time getting it done. I had a printer do them in the past but that could start being an unnecessary expense. I have everything at home to do it. OK WELL ITS GOOD TALKING TO YA'    PEACE,. -SHAY

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