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scorpionscar

Four new rockers are coming to life

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scorpionscar    18
16 minutes ago, curtisa said:

Not sure what you mean.

The candle wax should prevent the blade from getting jammed in the slot, making it easier to cut the slot and remove the saw when finished.

Any sawdust that works its way into the saw teeth should be easy to remove using a stiff brush.

I meant that if once the slots have been done, it was easy to remove the wax from the teeth of the blade. I've tried many hours ago, and the question is answered. As you told me the process is easier and is very easy to clean the wax from the blade too when the job is finished. Very good method I ignored. Thank you very much for your contribution.

Scorpionscar

 

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scorpionscar    18
25 minutes ago, RestorationAD said:

Titebond will be fine as long as the crack is clamped tight. I use epoxy on Ebony/Rosewoods because it is clear and is not affected as much by the oil in the wood.

I clamped the crack and it looks fine. The cracks are just in the limit where the final shape is. The glue will help when router the final shape. Thank you very much for your piece of advise. Any suggestion is always wellcome.

Scorpionscar

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scorpionscar    18
27 minutes ago, RestorationAD said:

Titebond will be fine as long as the crack is clamped tight. I use epoxy on Ebony/Rosewoods because it is clear and is not affected as much by the oil in the wood.

I clamped the crack and it looks fine. The cracks are just in the limit where the final shape is. The glue will help when router the final shape. Thank you very much for your piece of advise. Any suggestion is always wellcome.

Scorpionscar

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scorpionscar    18
2 hours ago, RestorationAD said:

I'm sorry, accidentally I've posted the same twice and don't know how to remove the repeated posts.

Edited by scorpionscar

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scorpionscar    18

Templates done, and shape drown in the definitive wood, in this case spanish cedar and alder. Bodies are ready for cutting but that's another chapter hahaha. Happy weekend to everybody and keep on rockin'.

 

p cuerpos.jpg

plantilla.jpg

Scorpionscar

Edited by scorpionscar

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scorpionscar    18

Today I've been finishing the templates in MDF and marking the neck ones over the european mapple. After that I've cut them with the band saw and route the escess of material. The necks are taking shape. Some pics os the process.

 

Fresadora.jpg

Mástil sierra banda.jpg

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Mr Natural    239
32 minutes ago, scorpionscar said:

Today I've been finishing the templates in MDF and marking the neck ones over the european mapple. After that I've cut them with the band saw and route the escess of material. The necks are taking shape. Some pics os the process.

 

Fresadora.jpg

 

now that is jig- big, sturdy and keeps the fingers away from that nasty router bit. and that router table looks massive!. I like it.

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scorpionscar    18

Mr Natural the table is very solid and sturdy, no vibrations, big and elevate the router with a car cat, easy and effective. I use a metacrilate display with two screws to protect the eyes and fingers. In spite of this security measurements don't to route the necks directly against the router bit. I consider that is very risky so I built this jig. The router bit sometimes throw the wood away and as a result, the fingers tend to go against it.

Scorpionscar

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scorpionscar    18

Today I've been w0rking on the shape of the necks, doing the headstock tuner drills and radiousing more fingerboards. Tomorrow I'll make the dot rosewood fingerboard inlays, truss rod channels and cutting bodies.

 

pareja mástiles.jpg

radiando.jpg

Taladros.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

Truss rod channel day. The Stratos trus rod channels are done. I'm going to use a low profile truss rod one. For adaptin them to the Strato construction, I'm going to have to adapt them and place upside down, I think this operation does not affect the correct functioning.

The problem with this lo profile truss rods is the solder, between the threaded rod and the pletin, this increments the width 6 decims of milimiter, as a result, is necessary to ampliate the channel made with a 6 mm router bit. For achieving this, I modify the base of the router of my jig and used two pletins (one of them moveable) and underneth, the screws of the machine goes with a channel that allows the machine movement over the base to the left and to the right in order to ampliate the channel. It works well, but it was very difficult to design the system and it takes time cause you have to router firs on the center, after that move the router to the left, and then to the right until the base of the router touches the correspondient pletin as a reference. Some pics of the issue:

 

Trus rod fresadora.jpg

Truss rod channel.jpg

Truss rod2.jpg

Scorpionscar

Edited by scorpionscar
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scorpionscar    18

Today I've rough cut the bodies with the band saw and was cutting also the veneer of one of the necks just where the nut goes. For this issue I used a block of wood in order to use it as a guide with the japanesse saw. Some pics of the results:

 

Cortando veneer2.jpg

IMG_6727.jpg

IMG_6733.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

Today I've been routing the bodies and almost finish one of the necks. I've begun to work over the volute and it looks great. I want to show you some tricks and jigs I use and I thing are usefull for guitarmaking. In one of the images you can see a mirror that I made with a piece of polished steel that helps me when I attatch the wood against the router bit and see how it works and when it reaches the bearings.

I put some pics with defects like the marks of the blade of the band saw and tear outs. Sometimes things like this occurs and is important to be conscious and learn how to avoid or if happen, how to correct them.

For routing the headstock I improvised a jig in order to hold the piece against the router table surface. Is not a good idea to do this with the fingers next to the router bit. some pics of the advances:

p espejo.jpg

P fresando cuerpo.jpg

P mordisco cuerno.jpg

P mordisco2.jpg

Pala templarian.jpg

Pala2.jpg

Pala3.jpg

Pala4.jpg

Pala5.jpg

Pala6.jpg

Scorpionscar

Edited by scorpionscar

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curtisa    467
On 11/13/2017 at 10:19 AM, scorpionscar said:

P mordisco cuerno.jpg

That, to me, looks like a classic case of feeding the workpiece into the rotating cutter such that you're routing 'uphill' against the grain of the timber. There are ways of strategically changing direction when routing that will minimise (if not eliminate) this from happening so that you only route 'downhill', but you do need to work with cutters that have bearings on top and bottom.

I made a brief write-up about this topic a while back. You may find it useful for future reference:

 

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scorpionscar    18
On 15/11/2017 at 9:23 AM, curtisa said:

That, to me, looks like a classic case of feeding the workpiece into the rotating cutter such that you're routing 'uphill' against the grain of the timber. There are ways of strategically changing direction when routing that will minimise (if not eliminate) this from happening so that you only route 'downhill', but you do need to work with cutters that have bearings on top and bottom.

I made a brief write-up about this topic a while back. You may find it useful for future reference:

 

Yes Curtisa, I fed the workpiece against the fiber, sometimes happens, specially in the horns zone and sometimes in the neck pocket (this zone is more problematic) for that resason I do it with hand router because I have more control. Thanks for the article Curtisa, very interesting, is important to learn why this tear outs occurs and how to avoid them.

Today I've cut the shape of the flying-v neck and the long tenon. For this element I used a template and the router, this is a well working method for me and very accurate. For cutting the neck with the band saw I built a jig that consists of a piece of oak wich I drilled four holes in order to put mini clamps I made cutting pieces of 1,5 cm out of a C profile piece of iron. It works well in order to add stability and safety specially with those angled necks.

On the other hand I was gluing two bookmatch tops for the flying-v and my Templarian (in honor the the city where I was born, Ponferrada located in the northwest of Spain. I put some pics of the process:

 

T book match.jpg

T book match2.jpg

T book match3.jpg

T calibradora.jpg

T formón tenon.jpg

T labrando voluta.jpg

T palas.jpg

T palas2.jpg

T prensillas 2.jpg

T prensillas pequeñas.jpg

T tenon.jpg

T tenon2.jpg

T tenon3.jpg

T tenon4.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

For having been good's day, I have no relax, all the day chisels and gouges in hand but the result is quite good. Fisrt of all I used a 12.7 mm radious bit in the router table for removing the extra of material and to act as a guide with the gouges. I enjoyed very much doing this work. I put some pics of the process:

 

Car1.jpg

Car2.jpg

Car3.jpg

Car4.jpg

Car5.jpg

Car6.jpg

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scorpionscar    18
4 hours ago, ScottR said:

Nice carve. It's good to see a carve that is actually carved with gouges.

SR

Thank you so much ScottR, personally, there is different ways to do this job, with a CNC for example, but I think is more artistic doing it with gouges, moreover, I love gouges and chisels, it's the part of the building I enjoy more.

Today I've finished the carving and the electronic cavity, the body is almost done. The first idea was to paint the guitar in solid white, but I used a good piece of european mapple and the way I was carving it, the veins of the wood that were appearing, encourage me to consider the idea of using a stain, maybe blue. What do you thing about this. Any suggestion is wellcome!!!

Some artistic pics I did of the carving.

 

Cu1.jpg

Cu2.jpg

Cu3.jpg

Cu4.jpg

Cu5.jpg

Cu6.jpg

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ScottR    1,366
12 minutes ago, scorpionscar said:

I love gouges and chisels, it's the part of the building I enjoy more.

Yep, me too.

You take great pictures, by the way.

SR

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scorpionscar    18
50 minutes ago, ScottR said:

Yep, me too.

You take great pictures, by the way.

SR

Thank you ScottR, I love the figure of electric guitars, is always that has fascinated me since I was a child, for that reason with the pass of the years, the destin have took me to the art of guitar building and as a result, I love taking pics of bodies and necks, in different perspectives and trying different iluminations. Electric guitars are really beautis and I'm in love with them.

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psikoT    250

I haven't commented yet, but following this thread from the shadows. Excellent work, as always... if they are like the explorer, we can expect some outstanding results. Keep the good work.

Since you asked, I hate colorful guitars, specially blue ones. I'd go for a tobacco burst or trans-black. But it's your guitar, you're the one who decide.

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scorpionscar    18
13 hours ago, psikoT said:

I haven't commented yet, but following this thread from the shadows. Excellent work, as always... if they are like the explorer, we can expect some outstanding results. Keep the good work.

Since you asked, I hate colorful guitars, specially blue ones. I'd go for a tobacco burst or trans-black. But it's your guitar, you're the one who decide.

Thank you so much for your words PSIKOT, they encourage me to follow doing as good work as possible. You build excellent guitars too. So as to finish, I like colourful tops, but you are right about a sunburst and trans black I had thought about that, I really love black guitars, and it will combine with the ebony headstock veneer and would allow the veins of the mapple be visible.

Today I've been working on the strat body routings. The job is no complete, but I was delayed cause had to do the electronics cavities templates and as you know is always a tedious job, but the result is quite wood. Some pics of the advances:

 

Cavidades1.jpg

Cavidades2.jpg

Cavidades3.jpg

Cavidades4.jpg

Cavidades5.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

I've just done the armcontour and the back carving. For the exterior perimeter I've used a 12.7 mm radious bit. I've had some problems with it instead of been almost new due to the bit transmited vibrations to the router and it was not easy to control it. I tried to do in two pases, but didn't work very well. Does anyone have problens using this bit?

 

Body1.jpg

Body2.jpg

Body3.jpg

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scorpionscar    18

All the shapes were done with gouges, they allow me much more control and are more artistical and artisan. Love them. Some pics of the process:

 

Gúbias1.jpg

Gúbias2.jpg

Edited by scorpionscar
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