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Flush Trimming Bits? Robo Sander?


stenns
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So I need to flush my 2.5" thick les paul body with my template. I went to Rona and they dont have flush trimming router bits long enough or spindle sander drums (ie robo sander) with bearings. SO my options are:

1. order the robo sander drums from stewmac

2. Find/buy 2 bits: 1 with top and 1 bottom mounted bearing. Start the trimming with the template on the top, using the shank mounted bit, turn over the guitar and use the tip mounted bit to trim the remaining material flush with the first cut. (as shown here: http://projectguitar.ibforums.com/index.ph...hl=robo+sander)

Which is best? Any other suggestions?

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Buy a bit with a top mounted bearing, and put the template on the top, and route like that, with the bearing along the template. Then drop the bit progressively lower until it gets too close where it might cut into the surface beneath. Then use a router table or something similar (not hard to make, if you don't have one) and run the body through that. I used one bit, with a cutting distance of 1.25", I believe, to route my entire LP.

Good luck!

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thanks for the replies guys!

Buy a bit with a top mounted bearing, and put the template on the top, and route like that, with the bearing along the template. Then drop the bit progressively lower until it gets too close where it might cut into the surface beneath. Then use a router table or something similar (not hard to make, if you don't have one) and run the body through that. I used one bit, with a cutting distance of 1.25", I believe, to route my entire LP.

Good luck!

Im afraid i dont quite understand...Are you reffering to the surface on which the guitar is resting, when you say "until it might cut into the surface beneath"? Wouldn't the chuck of the router descend into the guitar as you lower the bit? Also, do I use the same bit for the router table section?

Thanks much!

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Im afraid i dont quite understand...Are you reffering to the surface on which the guitar is resting, when you say "until it might cut into the surface beneath"? Wouldn't the chuck of the router descend into the guitar as you lower the bit? Also, do I use the same bit for the router table section?

looks like he means exactly what you were saying in your option #2, the two bit method of cutting from the top and then the bottom.

i agree that's your best option. i've looked for really tall top-bearing router bits and the tallest i've ever found is 2"--i've never seen one big enough to cut 2.5". and cutting partial width at a time will go easier on the router.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think that it will be a while before I try to rout another body.

I just recently started building my first guitar, and I thought I had it covered, yet I suffered some nasty tearouts. Luckily I have been able to sand away most of them, and I'm going for a solid finish, so I don't feel too bummed about it.

Anyway, personally I went for a quick order of robosanders at stewmac, and will be going that way in the future. It just seems to me that it is a lot safer using robosanders...

Good luck!!

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Robo-sander won’t get you as close to the shape of the template as a template follower bit. They leave something like 0.5 mm outside of the template. A super-safe way of doing it (and more expensive) is to rough out the shape with the robo-sander. Whit the small amount of wood left is much less risk for tear outs when finishing things of with template bits

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Robo-sander won’t get you as close to the shape of the template as a template follower bit. They leave something like 0.5 mm outside of the template. A super-safe way of doing it (and more expensive) is to rough out the shape with the robo-sander. Whit the small amount of wood left is much less risk for tear outs when finishing things of with template bits

+1. It's how I do it.

Frankly, the finish left by a robosander, or any other non-oscillating drum sander, is a major pain in the butt to clean up by hand. The finish left by a router bit, on the other hand, is lovely :-)

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Router bit:

Whiteside 1-1/4" diameter 2" long template bit. Awesome tool! The carbide is exceptional. Very little tear out with a sharp one. They are a staple tool in my shop.

Sander:

Robo sander makes a pretty rough surface that's not very exact. It's great if the router bit isn't an option. You would do well to get one of those wood core spindle sanders for your drill press in addition to the Robo. I use them when I want to finish sand here and there. This method will produce very very good results. I use J weight cloth backed abrasive on those wood core spindles.

-Doug

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Well from experience, I would recommend going the 2 bit route or using one bit in progressive steps.

I bought the 1/2" collet, 2" flush trimmer bit and I have to say it's the scariest bit I use. In fact, I have stopped using it. Since you are cutting so much length at once, it is VERY easy to have the piece get caught and the router try to send it flying. As it's hard to put an adequate guard around the bit, it becomes very dangerous.

I'm sure a lot of people use them just fine, but I found it to not be worth the risk to my fingers hehe. I use a smaller pattern bit now and lower it on progressive passes. Makes a very clean cut and a lot less chipping than the 2" bit.

Almost forgot.. I agree with Doug on the Robosander. I didn't like the edge it left either. Have had much better results with using the hand router & pattern bit.

Edited by wolfcoast
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