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Rigid 3/4 Woodboring Bit.


Ilikes2shred
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A few days ago I bought a "3/4" RIGID WOODBORING BIT DRILLS UP TO 6 TIMES FASTER THAN CONVENTIONAL SPADE BITS!" drill bit for drilling the hole for the jack as a replacement for my previous 7/8" spade (the spade somehow drilled 1 1/4" holes EVERY time.....). This bit is worse. I started drilling, and the threads on the end started to go in very slowly. As soon as the cutting part of the bit hit the guitar, the drill lurched forward and SPLIT THE GUITAR IN HALF (not in two, but a good one foot crack)! I tried more times on scrapwood, and the same thing happened every time (the drill was unable to even turn once the cutting part hit the wood).

10-30-08_2128.jpg

I glued the crack back together and it is drying now, so hopefully all is well...

So don't buy this bit....

How do you guys drill jack holes? Forstners?

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Forstner bits everytime. Those wood bore bits are not made to handle wood as hard as we use on guitars. They are made to chew threw soft pine quickly and fairly ugly. Even if that had not split I doubt the hole would have been 3/4".

But they do what they are intended for very well, I've used those for renovation work and they go much easier and faster through studs than spade bits.

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Also using a drill press is the way to go, if you didn't use one, which sounds like you used a hand drill? though not certain. Using a drill press keeps things very solid and can prevent problems like this sometimes because a hand drill can shake and vibrate inside the wood, catch and then crack, rip, or break things. Buy a quality normal forstner, I say quality because I've used normal forstners that were terrible, they barely cut and burnt like crazy even in smaller sizes. I prefer quality bits, as a show I watched called Wood Works suggested, sharper is safer. To do the jack hole, tilt your drill press table vertically and clamp the body to it and then drill the jack hole using the forstner bit. And for holes where you drill all the way through the piece of wood, try always keeping a piece of wood clamped against the area where the bit will come through to prevent it from tearing out and chipping. This works good for headstocks. Best of luck. J

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Also using a drill press is the way to go, if you didn't use one, which sounds like you used a hand drill? though not certain. Using a drill press keeps things very solid and can prevent problems like this sometimes because a hand drill can shake and vibrate inside the wood, catch and then crack, rip, or break things.

In this case it is the bit...like southpa I have used them at work,and the threads grab and force the cutting edges into the wood...if it is a good bit it will cut fast enough...if it is a Ridgid I doubt it...

Like was said,they are made for studs and joists...I would not even consider using one of those on a guitar...

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Also using a drill press is the way to go, if you didn't use one, which sounds like you used a hand drill? though not certain. Using a drill press keeps things very solid and can prevent problems like this sometimes because a hand drill can shake and vibrate inside the wood, catch and then crack, rip, or break things.

In this case it is the bit...like southpa I have used them at work,and the threads grab and force the cutting edges into the wood...if it is a good bit it will cut fast enough...if it is a Ridgid I doubt it...

Like was said,they are made for studs and joists...I would not even consider using one of those on a guitar...

Yea, sorry I wrote that wrong. I just meant to add onto what has been said, meaning the bit the was the issue as I know you guys know you stuff, but also it is helpful to use a drillpress if possible when drilling these types of holes. Even with a forstner you can get vibration with a hand drill, though I don't know that it would go as far as to cracking hardwood even in the extreme. I've drilled similar holes as a jack hole without a drill press, but it is just so much easier with one. I know I probably have some of those woodboring bits in my bin 'o bits, but I've never personally used one, unless at an apartment drilling holes for wiring, but I can't recall exactly. Anyhow, glad you pointed that out, the last thing I'd want is the OP trying the same bit on drill press thinking it'd make a difference. J

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Wow.... eight posts..... Thanks for the help.

I don't have a drillpress. I'd love one but I want to save up for a good one. I looked at this bit and thought, "Ah, how bad can this bit be? It's not like it will split the guitar in half or anything *chuckles to self*"

The glue has dried now and the crack is healed.

So I guess I learned my lesson. :D

On a side note, I think I must return about 50% of the items I get from home depot... That should tell me something...

"Jackhole" it makes me laugh every time.

Edited by Ilikes2shred
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