Jump to content

Carving A Top


Recommended Posts

http://www.potvinguitars.com/oldsite/builds/090408/part03/

That guitar looks a bit like what I'm making. Actually, my body is closest to a Schecter C-1, but its still modified to have a slightly bigger top horn, slightly deeper lower horn cut in, and the armrest area is being toned down in size a little. Its Sassafras on walnut (well, the walnut is tentative as of now pending sourcing, but I like the contrast between the two woods).

Anyways, useless details aside, I wanna carve the top. My plan is to rig up a jig like what the link shows. Except I want to change the carve on the horns. I like the PRS-esque carve extending onto the horns with the ridges. And the PRS-esque super deep carve in the lower horn. Is it doable using the router setup like that? I'm having a hard time visualizing the topography for that. Also, is is possible to use an angle grinder with a sanding disc to get that kind of carve? I've seen it done on more sweeping shapes, but I'm not sure about something like the PRS carve. Finally, in terms of cutting the neck angle on the body, cutting the neck tennon (its gonna be a bolt on) and routing for the recessed TOM and pickups, what order should that all happen in?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, there is a blast from my past! To be honest, I don't use that router jig all that much anymore. I've become somewhat more adept at using an angle grinder for roughing, but I absolutely do not recommend a grinder until you build up some practice hours. A grinder is quick way to turn a quilt top into a pile of sawdust :D. I also wouldn't recommend either method for the type of carve you're shooting for on the horns. I would tackle that with hand tools. Good luck with your build!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whether it helps or not, I was pleasantly surprised as how useful "finger" sanders are. They can easily bite and run away with you, but used with a little thought it made light work of dialling in the smoothness of a heel transition and belly cut. This is the heel just after sanding with 60 grit. I get they would be useful for dialling in a body carve at the top face end away from the recurve.

bng_heel.jpg

Edited by Prostheta
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, there is a blast from my past! To be honest, I don't use that router jig all that much anymore. I've become somewhat more adept at using an angle grinder for roughing, but I absolutely do not recommend a grinder until you build up some practice hours. A grinder is quick way to turn a quilt top into a pile of sawdust :D. I also wouldn't recommend either method for the type of carve you're shooting for on the horns. I would tackle that with hand tools. Good luck with your build!

Mike

So what method do you use now?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey man. Cut your Faux Binding, route to the level you want to leave at the end of your carve. Then draw topography lines around the body and place them about 1/2 a part. Then grab your router a rough route on top of those lines increasing the shallowness of each cut as you go. The grab an orbital with 120 grit, and some small ibex planes, and go to work...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, there is a blast from my past! To be honest, I don't use that router jig all that much anymore. I've become somewhat more adept at using an angle grinder for roughing, but I absolutely do not recommend a grinder until you build up some practice hours. A grinder is quick way to turn a quilt top into a pile of sawdust :D. I also wouldn't recommend either method for the type of carve you're shooting for on the horns. I would tackle that with hand tools. Good luck with your build!

Mike

So what method do you use now?

Off the top of my head...

-route the outer edge to a uniform final depth

-if the pickup plane is to remain flat, mark off that area

-doodle some topographic lines as required

-hog off the bulk with a grinder

-switch to chisels, planes, scrapers... you name it

-fine tune with sandpaper

I haven't done a tutorial in a while, but Jason Schroeder shows you exactly what I'm talking about in these photos...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/23662702@N03/sets/72157623862258333/with/4576081469/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, there is a blast from my past! To be honest, I don't use that router jig all that much anymore. I've become somewhat more adept at using an angle grinder for roughing, but I absolutely do not recommend a grinder until you build up some practice hours. A grinder is quick way to turn a quilt top into a pile of sawdust :D. I also wouldn't recommend either method for the type of carve you're shooting for on the horns. I would tackle that with hand tools. Good luck with your build!

Mike

So what method do you use now?

Off the top of my head...

-route the outer edge to a uniform final depth

-if the pickup plane is to remain flat, mark off that area

-doodle some topographic lines as required

-hog off the bulk with a grinder

-switch to chisels, planes, scrapers... you name it

-fine tune with sandpaper

I haven't done a tutorial in a while, but Jason Schroeder shows you exactly what I'm talking about in these photos...

[PIC REMOVED]

Thanks a lot, and thanks to everyone else too. That photo series was very helpful. I'll give the hand carving a shot, thought thinking about this more, I may end up doing a carve as I originally posted. We'll see what the top looks like when I start carving

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hmmm... that's another vote for the angle grinder, but what do you do in the winter time? Do you still work outside?

If it's not raining or snowing, yes. It doesn't take very long to do, then move back inside with planes and scrapers for the detailing work. My shop (outdoor, with the big tools) is unheated, so if I'm building in the winter it tends to be acoustics (indoor shop, fewer large tools required) rather than electrics (which for me involves a fair amount of larger power tool use).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...