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ScottR

Stripy Double Cut With An F-Hole

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5 minutes ago, Skyjerk said:

did you use some sort of gouge to rough in those carves?

I did. I use palm gouges of various sizes and shapes to rough in my carves. Some of them show up in the background of a few of the shots.

SR

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2 minutes ago, ScottR said:

I did. I use palm gouges of various sizes and shapes to rough in my carves. Some of them show up in the background of a few of the shots.

SR

I've considered getting a couple to try them out, but I have a hard enough time keeping edges on straight edged tools...

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Bloody hell Scott. You pull some real things out of wood every time! The roughly carved shots remind me of Morel mushrooms too.....yum....

Chris - do you have a leather strap for your edge tools?

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9 hours ago, Prostheta said:

Bloody hell Scott. You pull some real things out of wood every time! The roughly carved shots remind me of Morel mushrooms too.....yum....

Chris - do you have a leather strap for your edge tools?

Nope. In the skillz area, my sharpening skills are the ones most in need of improvement :)

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Okay. Well, once you do have a sharp tool it's easy to strop it against leather with a bit of metal polish (Autosol, white blizzard, aluminium oxide based, etc.) to keep it like a razor. If getting it there in the first place is the issue....that's a different story :-D

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10 hours ago, Prostheta said:

Bloody hell Scott. You pull some real things out of wood every time! The roughly carved shots remind me of Morel mushrooms too.....yum....

Like they say, the shapes are in the wood all along, you just have to set them free.:)

I must say, carving zebrawood is no picnic (morels not withstanding). You must cut across the grain. Any cut with the grain causes a split and a giant chip or splinter. You know how when you get a tiny hangnail that keeps catching on your pants pocket or anything that brushes up against you hand; so you pinch it between your thumbnail and middle fingernail, because it's small enough it should just pinch off...and you end up ripping it all the way to your elbow?

It's like that.

SR

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1 hour ago, Skyjerk said:

Nope. In the skillz area, my sharpening skills are the ones most in need of improvement :)

ditto. 

if you do get gouges- I found this thing to be a life saver. I was introducing all kinds of "wrong angles" when I attempted to do it by hand. this thing makes it so much easier and in my case idiot proof. 

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/flexcut-slipstrop-sharpening-kit?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI182KntWg2QIV2rbACh0Q2AYoEAQYASABEgKvOfD_BwE

 

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On 12/02/2018 at 12:47 AM, ScottR said:

Still have some shaping to do, and some curves to clean up on the back, but here is how it stands right now.

C00832.jpgC00833.jpgC00834.jpgC00835.jpg

That felt like a pretty productive weekend.:)

SR

Wow - only just caught up with this and what a treat to have done so :)

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On 2/14/2018 at 11:42 AM, Andyjr1515 said:

Wow - only just caught up with this and what a treat to have done so :)

Why thank you Andy!

I'm just back from a week in Las Vegas. I actually responded to this on my phone, but like so much in Vegas, that seems to have disappeared.:D

On the other hand my phone may have just done that out of spite. I'm sure it knows that I hate it and all of its species.:P

SR

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On 2/11/2018 at 6:47 PM, ScottR said:

That felt like a pretty productive weekend.:)

This one on the other hand was all about cleaning up compound curves. That involves a ton of sanding and touching and feeling and peering at the shape at various angles and light angles....all for subtle changes that don't show up in photos all that well.

C00836.jpgC00838.jpgC00839.jpgC00841.jpgC00844.jpg

SR

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I am not yet finished sanding with 120 grit....C00845.jpgC00847.jpgC00849.jpgC00850.jpgC00851.jpg

....and it will take all week for my fingerprints to grow back.

SR

 

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That's definitely become "your thing" Scott....the f-hole through the body....saying that, there are so many aspects of your builds which are uniquely your own such as the volute, etc. I don't think too many builders have that sort of recognisable set of flourishes.

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Is that stain or grain filler darkening the pores? I used to dislike Zebrano, however with the application of filler and dye it looks amazing. This will be no exception.

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I have to admit that I panicked pretty hard when I saw the pore filling/staining photos! The end result is amazing though. It adds just enough contrast.

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9 hours ago, Prostheta said:

Is that stain or grain filler darkening the pores? I used to dislike Zebrano, however with the application of filler and dye it looks amazing. This will be no exception.

That is a dark brown dye, made from black, mahogany brown, Bordeaux red, blue and orange. The pore filling will be done with your pumice/slurry technique. The test pieces are still a bit gritty, so I'm assuming there was too much pumice for those small surface areas. Did you use a coffee filter when making the tru-oil pumice slurry?

SR 

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3 hours ago, Stu. said:

I have to admit that I panicked pretty hard when I saw the pore filling/staining photos! The end result is amazing though. It adds just enough contrast.

That is a shockingly scary look all covered with dye like that, isn't it? Dyeing zebrano and then polishing the wood afterwards changes the look into something altogether different, but more interesting to my eye. And the chatoyancy! Those dark areas completely flip in varying angles of light.

SR

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1 hour ago, ScottR said:

That is a dark brown dye, made from black, mahogany brown, Bordeaux red, blue and orange. 

emptying out all the old dyes are we Scotty? you forgot purple, pink and green. 

just kidding-  your test scraps are looking pretty sweet nice and deep/rich wood tones. liking it. 

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15 minutes ago, Mr Natural said:

emptying out all the old dyes are we Scotty? you forgot purple, pink and green. 

just kidding-  your test scraps are looking pretty sweet nice and deep/rich wood tones. liking it. 

:P

I was looking for just that perfect shade of burnt brown.:D

SR

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16 hours ago, ScottR said:

C00872.jpgC00873.jpgC00874.jpgC00875.jpgC00879.jpgC00880.jpg

I began a test on scrap process that has a couple of pieces finished the same way and then has Tru-Oil started, with the plan being to pore fill with pumice and slurry. It also illustrates how the body will look in time.

C00882.jpg

SR

Well how absolutely delightful is that! 

Bravo - I bow to the master :rock

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2 hours ago, ScottR said:

That is a dark brown dye, made from black, mahogany brown, Bordeaux red, blue and orange. The pore filling will be done with your pumice/slurry technique. The test pieces are still a bit gritty, so I'm assuming there was too much pumice for those small surface areas. Did you use a coffee filter when making the tru-oil pumice slurry?

SR 

 

I've never done a slurry fill with pumice in Tru-Oil, Scott! Only with wet n' dry sandpaper in the "expected" manner. I have however used pumice with shellac, which is how we got into this discussion about using it with Tru-Oil in the first place. To be fair, I'm unsure what to expect from using it in this context and I'd likely just use sandpaper anyway. Pumice becomes an invisible part of the finish in shellac, and I would hope it does that in oil too.

So your test piece still feels gritty? Hmm. It might be too much pumice or possibly how it's being applied. With shellac I use a fad (also called a rubber, which is just a linen cover over a wool reservoir) with pumice. The pumice drags into the fine woven surface of the linen, making it into an abrasive surface. A coffee filter would work quite differently. I used coffee filters with Tru-Oil years back as a way of producing a very fine film. Since then I prefer linen for that also, bearing in mind the whole self-ignition thing.

That grittiness is a problem. The test piece needs re-doing a couple of times to confirm the validity of pumice and oil. Shellac dries within a minute, binding slurry and pumice into the surface swiftly....oil....that will need several careful applications, with time between each one so that subsequent sessions don't unpack your good work.

I'd hate for issues with the finishing schedule to mess with that stellar sanding work Scott.

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9 minutes ago, Prostheta said:

I'd hate for issues with the finishing schedule to mess with that stellar sanding work Scott.

I'll get it worked out before going live with it, The pumice did go invisible, and it did slurry up as fast as it does with sandpaper. I haven't spent much time with it yet, beyond building up a few layers of base and one slurry coat. My technique will get some refining in the days to come. I may even test a little rotten stone while I'm at it.

SR

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I finished my sanding and starting in with the Tru-Oil.

C00895.jpgC00896.jpg

The pictures do not not convey this, but walking past this top and staring at it justifies the effort of dying the pores black and then polishing the wood to the full cycle of micromesh. This top looks like it is breathing. Each step causes the grain to flip and the higher contrast from the dyed pores makes it that much more obvious.

C00898.jpgC00900.jpg

SR

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