Jump to content

Do I Have To Completely Sand The Body Down To Spray Over It?


Recommended Posts

so ur sanding off an existing finish?

what kind of finish is already on the guitar?

what grit sandpapers do u have/using?

are you sanding by hand or by powersander?

red sparkle type

just a solid color with some poly over it. i'm using a 100 grit

by hand

and on a few places I went in the edges too deep so now the edges are gone, it's like a small contour. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just rough them up. Knock the finish down so it has some tooth and the paint will stick.

the original color is red.

I'm planning on painting it arctic white

will it show through?

i would just rough up all of the body with that 100 grit sandpaper, by hand will work. then if you can i advise that once the whole body is rough, use a higher grit mayb 320 or even higher would be better after that, so that there arnt huge scratches in the body any more. if u r just using spray paint put down some primer, white will work but with an original bright finish i would use a grey primer. then put down some color.

if u r using spray paint, what kind are u using? ive used krylon and it worked pretty well, but i read that they changed their formula and its not as good as before.

Edited by zeppelinchld
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do not sand anything using 320 grit after sanding to 100 grit - you will end up having massive grit lines after you spray the primer that will be a pita to remove later on. Always progress on grits. 100, 150, 220, 300/320, 400 and you're set for primer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are just going to paint it another solid color then NO, you don't have to take it right back to wood. Scuff it up real good and fill dents, nicks, scratches 'n dings. Type of filler is up to you, auto bondo does the trick for me on those little nasties. Sand everything smooth down to 320 grit, start with your 100, then 180 then 320 is fine. Use a solid, flat block for the flat areas and wrap the paper around a block of firm foam for curved areas. Clean the dust off very well either with compressed air or a quick wipe down with a damp rag making sure you flip the rag over to a clean side every now and then. Mask the neck pocket and inside cavities with paper and blue or green masking tape. If you are going for arctic white then use a primer that has the closest base color. Grey is good white is better. Shoot your primer, about half a dozen good coats, avoid drips, runs, sags etc. I always let primer dry for at least over night. Lightly scuff the primer with 320, clean off the dust and inspect for thin areas, or sanding breakthrus, shoot more primer if necessary. Then shoot your arctic white topcoats and clearcoats.

Don't rush things, be systematic and thorough. There are NO shortcuts in doing a good finishing job. Give ample time between top coat painting sessions for your paint to "gas off" before continuing to the next stage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What kind of guitar is it and how old is it? Also, is the current finish the original finish? It's more likely than not that it's a poly finish(this does not mean polyurethane as you would find at a homeowner's store but rather a catalytically cured automotive coating). If it is poly, you should be able to get away with spray can primer and paints from a local automotive store. I've used duplicolor's products before with good results. Be sure to use duplicolor's "scratch filling sandable primer" and not their regular "sandable primer." The stuff you want is gray, I believe. I've had some awful results with their other sandable primers that are red and black, I believe. If I were you, I would buy the paints and test on a section of the guitar that still has paint on it to see if you get any sort of negative reaction. Worst case you have to sand off a little bit more paint. It may end up saving you time though.

peace,

russ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What kind of guitar is it and how old is it? Also, is the current finish the original finish? It's more likely than not that it's a poly finish(this does not mean polyurethane as you would find at a homeowner's store but rather a catalytically cured automotive coating). If it is poly, you should be able to get away with spray can primer and paints from a local automotive store. I've used duplicolor's products before with good results. Be sure to use duplicolor's "scratch filling sandable primer" and not their regular "sandable primer." The stuff you want is gray, I believe. I've had some awful results with their other sandable primers that are red and black, I believe. If I were you, I would buy the paints and test on a section of the guitar that still has paint on it to see if you get any sort of negative reaction. Worst case you have to sand off a little bit more paint. It may end up saving you time though.

peace,

russ

it's a 2005 MIJ jackson DXMGT. it is the original finish.

before checking this thread I already sanded the majority of the finish off... i might just finish the job while i'm at it I think.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...