Jump to content

Neck angles


Recommended Posts

Hi

i know that you have to angle the headstock back or use string trees but is there a specific angle for the neck to be related to the body. I've looked at my bro's strat and can't see much of an angle if any but really i need to know about PRS/Les Paul guitars and i don't have one going spare.

Thanks in advance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Angle the headstock to suit your headstock thickness and tuner type, and tuner location. Its best that you draw it out yourself, so you can feel comfortable with the layout. It will also depend on how much wood you have (single piece) or if its scarf jointed. Iam currently building a series of guitars with a 5 degree angle, and have done 13 degree angles previously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

i know that you have to angle the headstock back or use string trees but is there a specific angle for the neck to be related to the body. I've looked at my bro's strat and can't see much of an angle if any but really i need to know about PRS/Les Paul guitars and i don't have one going spare.

Thanks in advance

please clarify if you are talking about headstock angle or neck angle...it is unclear

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If he's not tlaking about neck angles, then why did he title it "Neck angles" ?? The reason strats dont have neck angels is because their bridges dont require it. Whereas a Les paul or a PRS with a Tune o matics bridge does require a neck angle. But PRS' with the tremolo do not need a neck angle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How come I understand it (I'm the last one to understand what's going on).

My brain says he asked something like this :

I know headstocks have an angle, or there are "string trees" to simulate an angle, but what about the entire neck in relation to the body ; does the neck angle downward at the neck/body joint ? If so, how much, especially on a PRS type guitar ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How come I understand it (I'm the last one to understand what's going on).

My brain says he asked something like this :

I know headstocks have an angle, or there are "string trees" to simulate an angle, but what about the entire neck in relation to the body ; does the neck angle downward at the neck/body joint ? If so, how much, especially on a PRS type guitar ?

that's what i get out of it too.but clarification from the author would be nice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

cheers for your replies, sorry if i was unclear. I need to know about the angle of the neck compared to the body. I know that strats headstock is not angled and that gibsons/prs do but its the neck/body angle i need info on. I think some of you covered it but just to clarify myself

cheers so far.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, so you are observing that there are two sets of angles. One, the headstock angle. Two, the angle of the neck on the body.

A typical Strat has no headstock angle, and no angle to the body. Everything is straight.

Gibson style guitars will have an angled headstock (anywhere from 10 to 17 degrees as noted in previous replies), and the neck is angled... enough to have the strings meet the bridge in the right place. I don't play Gibsons and I don't like set necks so I'm not the right person to talk about that.

Have you tried getting Melvyn Hiscock's book? He does a good job of explaining this sort of thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On a guitar with a Les Paul type bridge, and a carved top, there needs to be quite an angle, so that the bridge can be adjusted either up or down, when the strings are sitting at about the right action height off the fret-board.

From my understanding, that is the ideal outcome, but it doesn't work out so perfect with many guitars, especially acoustics. I've heard that only 1 out of 10 leave the factory with the neck angle and other things all matching up properly. A pretty common guitar repair is a " neck re-set" to correct a neck angle that is too imperfect (like the bridge can't be adjusted to get the string height right)

On a strat, there's no carved top and the stock bridges and saddles are pretty low, and don't need the string height to be that far off the body. But on non-recessed floyded strats, you need neck angle. Even the stock bridges sometimes need it.

I angle my strat's neck with a tapered shim, because I like the strings farther off the body than normal, but still want low string height over the fret-tops.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...