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Soldering


Riviera
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Brian, i found/wandered across a great little Soldering site awhile back. Shall see if i can find it again :-)

Rob

p.s.

please note:My soldering is somewhat un-orthadox, In fact the end result is most impressive, Which surprises many people, As i appear to be being a cack handed spazzwit ! :D

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If you need some help with Soldering, that is what I do for a living.

Here is the standards we use:

NASA WORKMANSHIP STANDARDS

Just a couple things to remember:

The DO's-

1. DO Let your soldering iron heat up for at least 10 minutes before you try to solder

2. DO Clean your wires and part leads with rubber alochol before soldering

3. DO put a bit of solder on the tip of the iron before touching it to the parts to be solder, this helps for heat transfer

The DO NOT's

1. DO NOT use the very point of the iron, use the side of the tip... more surface area = better heat transfer

2. DO NOT move the iron around, hold it still on the joints

3. DO NOT move the parts around after the solder has flowed, but before it cools, this causes a "Cold Solder Joint"

Remember- that Iron is about 500 degrees F - don't touch it or let the tip hit your kitchen table

Remember- Your solder joint should look smooth and shiney after it cools, it it looks grey and grainy, it is a cold joint and should be reheated

I hope this helps...

:D

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I'm pretty sure that's Jem's wife in his avatar, hence he is a he. If I'm wrong, feel free to brand me with a 45W soldering iron.

:D

This thread is great. I've done my share of soldering in the past, but I've never been sure if I've been using proper technique, etc., and I botch the job as often as I'm successful. Any more links and tips would be well appreciated by many on here, I'm sure!

Greg

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"Remember- Your solder joint should look smooth and shiney after it cools, it it looks grey and grainy, it is a cold joint and should be reheated "

Seems like i got quite a few cold solder joints :D I always have problems when i solder. I ALWAYS burn myself, and the solder always seems to become to hot and flow like water, which isent fun B)

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Just an aside, but a little help for a confused Yank - what exactly is a "cack handed spazzwit "?

And one more DO NOT - never go anywhere near a printed circuit board with a 40 watt iron (unless you feel the need to learn how to repair a pcboard). :D Yup, I had to replace the board.

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I ALWAYS burn myself, and the solder always seems to become to hot and flow like water, which isent fun  B)

:D

That is the whole point! LOL

try to get some needlenose pliers to hold your wires with... :D

One more thing...

"The bigger the blob, the better the job!" Is NOT a good soldering motto!

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Here's a link to a thread started here a couple months ago.

Soldering advice

That may help. Good luck! :D

A good rule I've been taught before:

"A good electrical connection begins with a good mechanical connection."

A common mistake I see:

DO NOT BLOW ON THE SOLDERED AREA TO COOL IT QUICKLY. This is another cause of cold solder joints. This cools the outer surface of your solder faster than the inside of the solder and very small cracks can develop at this point causing possible signal loss.

I also use flux to help transfer heat from the iron to the material and to help the solder flow better. I just make sure to clean it off when I'm done.

When removing wire shielding before tinning I leave a little more shielding than what I need because when the wire is heated the shielding will shrink back a little.

When using 60/40 solder I run my iron at 600-650 degrees.

I solder some very small and fragile stuff at work and have learned to heat up the area quickly but with only the amount of heat needed to heat the component and surface enough then flow the solder and get outta there when it's done. Too much heat can damage components and I've also found pre-programmed chips can have their memory damaged when too much heat is applied. I've seen some pots with plastic guts that can melt too.

For added safety, since I solder so often, I exhale (don't blow) as I solder so that I'm not inhaling the solder fumes (tin & lead fumes can't be good for the brain).

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Howdy,

There are a couple of tools that I find very useful when soldering. A pair of vice grips to hold small and light things, such as wires I am trying to tin. Needle nose pliers to hold things when I solder, so I don't burn my fingers. I also use them to bend wires.

And never, ever, try to catch a falling soldering iron. I have not made this mistake myself, but I have seen it tried. It almost always ends in disaster.

Guitar Ed

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It almost always ends in disaster.

and pain...

occasionally a big black spot on or near the palm of your hand...

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Hi Dan,

If the touch is short enough, it looks like this: finger.jpg

I was trying to fit my finger and my soldering iron into the same crowded space. :D This is only a second degree burn. A third degree burn would be black.

Oh well. More soldering tomorrow.

Guitar Ed

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Nicely groomed 'fret hand' fingernails there ed :D

I hate when I stupidly solder a component on the lead side of the board while my finger is touching the component on the other B) duh

As for dropping the iron, I always make sure I set the iron in the holder and make sure the cord is out of the way so it doesn't get yanked. It's also is a good idea to have a workbench that's high enough so that if the iron falls it won't touch the ground. (nasty burn marks on the floor of another tech's work area :D )

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