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Angled Headstock?


Buck Radius
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Personally, i use one of these:

Ultimate tool

Yep , I've used that tool before many times and it always works really well for me. It's also free. :D

This is the 'real' secret weapon to learning .

O.K.........I did a quick search for you. Here's but a fraction of what you''ll find using the 'ultimate tool'.

linky 1

linky 2

cheers, Stu

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Personally, i use one of these:

Ultimate tool

Yep , I've used that tool before many times and it always works really well for me. It's also free. :D

This is the 'real' secret weapon to learning .

O.K.........I did a quick search for you. Here's but a fraction of what you''ll find using the 'ultimate tool'.

linky 1

linky 2

cheers, Stu

First link is a great source. Kathy has a great web site-Link with lots of great ideas and plans. Now if I could only get my shop to look as clean and well put together as hers I would be in great shape.

I use my sliding compound miter saw to cut my scarfs. Always seemed to work pretty slick.

Peace,Rich

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Dear Rhoads56,

Unfortunately, your attempt at advice was of little help. Thankfully, many of the subsequent responders were very helpful. You might reflect on just why you post on this site. Is it to help others, or to make yourself feel superior to others?

I had already conducted several searches, but what I was looking for were the personal experiences of members who had been successful. I understand that you are a fine builder and are very experienced, but I'm sure you started from scratch just like the rest of us.

Perhaps I'm over-reacting, but again, perhaps you shouldn't respond to a post if you really have nothing substantive to add.

Regards,

Buck Radius

P.S. Once again, if I'm off base, I apologize. And I do very much like your transparent blue GS model.

Personally, i use one of these:

Ultimate tool

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This thread is discussed many times per month. Use the search, there is nothing new in this thread at all.

The fact you added "Please respond soon as I am dying to get this part done" shows you are impatient, and that GENERALLY means you havent bothered researching. If you had, you would have had no reason to ask. I use the word GENERALLY, because once again, we see this type of urgent request several times per month, from people who havent bothered to look around.

We can argue all day.

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Dear Rhoads56,

Unfortunately, your attempt at advice was of little help. Thankfully, many of the subsequent responders were very helpful. You might reflect on just why you post on this site. Is it to help others, or to make yourself feel superior to others?

i disagree his advice was very accurate

and Perry loves to feel superior. therefore his post :D

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Dear Rhoads56,

Unfortunately, your attempt at advice was of little help. Thankfully, many of the subsequent responders were very helpful. You might reflect on just why you post on this site. Is it to help others, or to make yourself feel superior to others?

i disagree his advice was very accurate

and Perry loves to feel superior. therefore his post :D

I dont need to make a post to feel superior :D

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I need some help here. What is the best way to cut the 15 degree angle for the angled headstock. I tried the backsaw but it (I) was not acurate enough. How do you guys do it? What tools do you use?

Please respond soon as I am dying to get this part done.

Buck

back to basics a hand saw and plane. A plane bigger than a block plane. sandwich the two together then plane them. The most important thing is a clean glue joint. If you are using figured wood it will be difficult, to not rip it up use a low angled plane.

For me a table saw has no equal fast and fearless. Normally I bandsaw out my necks and do not joint the headstock. Always pros and cons to everything you do as you can tell.

Woodenspoke

Edited by Woodenspoke
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Building all the jigs will take time and patience.

I used a hand saw and cleaned up the joint with a chisel and scraper.

Once I was close to the mark, I grabbed the pieces and sanded them with a whole sheet of sandpaper against a perfectly flat surface.

One hand held the paper, whilde the other slid the wood while maintaining alignment.

Itrimmed the wood after the glue up.

The joint was perfect.

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Planing the headstock for scarfing or just smoothing the face on a one-piece neck, is the easiest task to do on a guitar with a hand plane in my opinion. If you're serious about woodworking, you can get away without them but you really should learn how to use hand planes properly and I think this is a great way to start, and I can't think of an easier or quicker method than breaking out a Stanley #4, #5 or their wider '1/2' counterparts and planing away on that headstock join - an added bonus is there's 0% chance you'll lop one of your fingertips off in the process, and the shavings will be much easier to clean up than powersaw or router dust.

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