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Soldering Gun


canuckguitarist
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I saw this picture in another thread but didn't want to hijack the thread so I posted it here. Anyway, look at the guy soldering on the left side of the page, I thought you weren't supposed to use those kind of guns on guitars because...well...for some reason. I thought you were supposed to use the pencil kind...

Am I wrong or......what?

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On those gun types, it creates a magnetic field inside the "loop" of the gun. You are not supposed to get it close to a pickup, so it's ok, to use it on the back side of the guitar like in that photo, and even to remove frets, as long as you don't get any closer to the pickups than around the 14th fret.

Also on these guns, you can take a piece of metal, like a screwdriver and put it through the loop of the gun and it will magnetize the screwdriver, or whatever. Also, if you had a screwdriver that was magnetized and wanted it unmagnetized, you could put it through the gun loop and it will demagnetize it.

This is all from what I've read, been told, as I have never owned one of these gun type irons.

Rob

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Hey that guy's got my gun it's a Weller :D and yes keep them away from the pickups plus they can and will ruin a pot in a heartbeat if your not careful because they heat up so quickly.

One advantage to them is of course they are not "On" all of the time, you have to hit the trigger to heat them up.

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I use a variable wattage pencil type 20-40 watts. On a side note I wish I could attend one of these luthier schools. Although, I don't think the mortgage company would understand my passion when they don't receive this months, or next months check though.

:D

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I've got an orange Weller. It has a light to tell me it's on. What a nice little solder gun (the insanity of my flu symptoms must be returning :D ). I think the pen ones are easier to use because you can have a point on the end.

Hey maybe you guys could help me here (not meaning to digress) I have to replace the solder tips after 3-4 uses because it no longer heats thru it. I can leave it on for 30 min and it will only make one tiny spot that will melt the solder. The solder I use has flux in it...could this be the reason?

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"I use a gun. I dont even touch the pots. It melts the solder so well, that I just hold it above and the stuff does its own job. Flux helpd too. "

I thought the way to solder was to make the actual parts (pot lug, wire) hot enough that they melt the solder when solder is applied to them, but solder isn't applied directly to the iron, except to tin it.

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even though I seem to know the "correct way" to solder, I have the worse damn luck with solder guns. I go through them like water and that wouldn't be so bad, but soldering is a very small part of what I do. I keep trying to "upgrade" and the same crap happens anyway. The gun just doesn't get hot enough after only a few months. Also, sometimes I leave them on overnight by mistake (don't tell my insurance co) and they never work as good after that. Maybe it's time for one of those 3-prong jobs. The Craftsman is my latest, seemed real heavy duty, now it's getting to be a weak little piece of crap.

Rob

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i use a radio shack 10 dollar pencil and got a separate thin tip for it. To me this is the best setup. Because #1 cheap. #2 guns are magnetically shielded and can mess up your p/us. plus i didnt want to screw my comp parts. Guns heat up really fast and stay really hot. They are good for soldering large items such as 2 metal sheets together. I would DEFINATELY not reccomend them for little things such as pots. clumsy and easy to burn off something. get a whole setup if you can afford it with a holder a sponge and a variable heat thingy. the pen tipped ones are the most accurate. take it slow and keep your soldering iron on both points for a while or you WILL get a cold joint. been there done that. Not a good idea, you'll just wind up de-soldering the joint. major pain in the ass. Just make it a good solder in the first place by taking about 4 mins per joint. No big deal.

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