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looks to me like splits from the seasoning of the wood- the ends of planks often have some wastage because of this and it should really be cut away first.

if the woods completely dry and stable now then you can fill it with epoxy as said above and go with it, just as a prototype to test your ideas

+1

Medium CA would work as well. That's pretty much what it was made for.

SR

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This was never meant to be sold. It is just a prototype. My bet is that it occurred because of a combination of the factors you all have mentioned. There was no sign of issues on the blank itself, aside from the obvious knots, prior to this. (Not that I would really know what to look for... :D ) Unfortunately I wasnt there to monitor The cutting process either. I submitted my digital file and my material with explicit instructions in case I wasn't, by I didnt foresee something like this. I think Ill go with the medium CA approach. I hate sanding epoxy!

Edited by MuffinPunch
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I hadnt needed to think about this until now, but would it be advisable to finish shaping the body and sand blast the recessed graphic into the front before I attempt to fill the split gaps? I just worry that the dried CA (or whatever I end up using) will hold up better to sand blasting than the alder around it, leaving "veins" in that area of the graphic.

I had originally planned to finish this body using waterborne automotive base coat over polyester primer, and topped with automotive clear. Im not opposed to doing it differently though. I have even speculated on the idea of using a powder coating. I like the idea of finishing this in a non-traditional way as this is a relatively non tradition approach to guitar building already, but Im not sure what limitations are inherent in the materials im using. Any Help?

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That is a good point. I can think of two counter points. Sandblasting the cracks will possible round the edges of them and basically gives you the oppsite effect of the veins you describe. Also if you are talking about altering the surface plane with etched designs before filling then you are proposing matching the etched contours with your fill. I deal with these cracks all the time in my carvings and have filled before carving and after carving. Before is much better. It does create a different hardness that has to be treated with care. In your case, your best bet may be to pack those cracks with sanding dust and then soak with thin CA. This will get the hardness of the fill much closer to that of the surrounding wood, which should lessen the veining effect. I would first leach thin CA down into those cracks from the end grain direction, which will go a long ways towards preventing them from splitting any more.

SR

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+1 Fill now.

Not a fan of medium CA for cracks that large. It is hard to get it nice and clear with no bubbles. Not saying it can't be done... just not a fan.

Would you suggest the epoxy instead then? Or thin CA rather than medium?

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+1 Fill now.

Not a fan of medium CA for cracks that large. It is hard to get it nice and clear with no bubbles. Not saying it can't be done... just not a fan.

Would you suggest the epoxy instead then? Or thin CA rather than medium?

Not sure in the value of soaking with thin CA before filling ( I have done it but the Epoxy will soak into the wood fibers just the same). I have used wood dust and thin CA... wicked nasty fumes and for really deep cracks you have to fill in stages as sometimes the CA will harden before soaking all dust causing a pocket of dust. Since you are painting it the main thing you want is it not to show through.

I would suggest a good epoxy like West Systems with Silica filler in it to make it thick. The main thing is that it hardens all the way and cures before you start painting. The good thing about the epoxy is you could also use it as a filler for the whole body.

You could try Z-poxy but while really nice in my experience it still doesn't get as hard as West Systems.

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I asked the guys in the shop at school for advice in filling those cracks and I got a whole bunch of different responses as well. So I took a varied approach; one that Im already counting on getting a lot of grief from you guys about...

100_5184.jpg

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But for my purposes it worked out perfect. I went with a thick CA (Slow ZAP) and drizzled many layers into the end grain of the split area. The fumes dont bother me, but it took a good hour of drizzling. Then after sanding the area down using a combination of belt, spindle, and random orbital sanders to reveal the air pockets within

the cracks, I simply finished it off with wood putty and more sanding by hand. Smooth as silk! Not pretty to look at, I admit. But as I will be painting this one anyway and its main purpose is to be the pattern for my silicone mould, Im perfectly happy with it. I also took some time to shape the heel contour a bit.

100_5195.jpg

Man Prostheta, you were'nt kidding about keeping the body still with a sabre style carve on both sides! This thing wobbles like a Weebles no matter what side you have it on! I would have had my work cut out for me trying to do this all by hand! Tomorrow- the CORES!

Edited by MuffinPunch
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I would like to know how much heat buildup occurred during the CNC routing of the body,because too much heat can cause that kind of splitting.You know..if the bit started to get a little dull...

I saw some burn marks on the cutoff pieces that make me think that could be it.

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I would like to know how much heat buildup occurred during the CNC routing of the body,because too much heat can cause that kind of splitting.You know..if the bit started to get a little dull...

I saw some burn marks on the cutoff pieces that make me think that could be it.

Thats a good point. I honestly couldnt say. I bought the bit to cut my battle axe guitar and it hasnt seen any use since, but that maple was HARD! It wouldnt surprise me if it dulled the blade.

Edited by MuffinPunch
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I saw a nice Ibanez Sr405 bass in Sound City here in Pori yesterday. Already missing having tools and a workshop. Would love to make a bass that shape, but using decent woods. This is shaping up to be a fantastic adventure for you, MP. Keep it up man.

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I saw a nice Ibanez Sr405 bass in Sound City here in Pori yesterday. Already missing having tools and a workshop. Would love to make a bass that shape, but using decent woods. This is shaping up to be a fantastic adventure for you, MP. Keep it up man.

Miten olet mieltynyt Suomi? I agree though this becoming a good guitar.

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I saw a nice Ibanez Sr405 bass in Sound City here in Pori yesterday. Already missing having tools and a workshop. Would love to make a bass that shape, but using decent woods. This is shaping up to be a fantastic adventure for you, MP. Keep it up man.

Miten olet mieltynyt Suomi? I agree though this becoming a good guitar.

Hey, lets keep the inside jokes to a minimum. I dont speak Finnish (guessing). :D

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Started on the cores today. First of all, I laser cut my template on 1/4" masonite.

100_5217.jpg

Then I rough cut my neck profile and the angle for my HS scarf. I think I want to add a maple accent piece in the scarf now. Well see.

100_5205.jpg

Just for fun I wedged the template into the body cavity and put the pups in place to see what it would look like. I love the profile of the new extended housing EMG pups. very clean. Also, I actually like the contrasting dark core against the pale Alder. The final product will have a similar effect hopefully, only inverted.

100_5218.jpg

Shop is closed till monday, so I guess Ill take a little break on this project, celebrate my independence or something...

Edited by MuffinPunch
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I saw a nice Ibanez Sr405 bass in Sound City here in Pori yesterday. Already missing having tools and a workshop. Would love to make a bass that shape, but using decent woods. This is shaping up to be a fantastic adventure for you, MP. Keep it up man.

Miten olet mieltynyt Suomi? I agree though this becoming a good guitar.

Hey, lets keep the inside jokes to a minimum. I dont speak Finnish (guessing). :D

No inside jokes there.

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I saw a nice Ibanez Sr405 bass in Sound City here in Pori yesterday. Already missing having tools and a workshop. Would love to make a bass that shape, but using decent woods. This is shaping up to be a fantastic adventure for you, MP. Keep it up man.

Miten olet mieltynyt Suomi? I agree though this becoming a good guitar.

Hey, lets keep the inside jokes to a minimum. I dont speak Finnish (guessing). :D

No inside jokes there.

I figured as much. I was just referring to the fact that I dont know what you said, and am therefore on the "outside", joke or not. This is my thread after all...

Edited by MuffinPunch
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And people have said Ive cheated by using a milling machine for routing... :D

That CNC machine must make things nice. :D

Cool shape, and those cracks were unfortunate. Glad to see you filled them.

Id like to see how this build turns out.

Yes Dillon using a milling machine is cheating but in my opinion only and yes I am sure CNCs are nice but then you can't call the guitar hand made.

By the way Muffinpunch all I asked Prostheta was how he is liking Finland since he moved from England.

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Cool shape, and those cracks were unfortunate. Glad to see you filled them.

Id like to see how this build turns out.

Thanks. A lot of hard work went into getting that body shape just right, and developing the right ind of carve for it. Im pretty happy with the way things are working out too.

Yes Dillon using a milling machine is cheating but in my opinion only and yes I am sure CNCs are nice but then you can't call the guitar hand made.

By the way Muffinpunch all I asked Prostheta was how he is liking Finland since he moved from England.

I dont see how a using a mill is any more cheating than using a plunge or a table router. Im not about to get into another debate about CNC vs "hand made", but just try doing a full body carve, front and back, without a CNC machine! Not saying it cant be done, but the headache just isnt worth it to me. Developing a top notch, mill quality 3d model to input into the machine is no easy task either, and considering the state the body is in when it comes off the CNC and the fact that the main part of the guitar (i.e. the core) is getting done entirely by hand, Ill get pretty defensive if someone tries to contradict me when I claim this is a hand built guitar.

I actually looked up what you said on an online Finnish to English translator (I know Im a dork) and It said something like "How do you fond of Finland?", so I kinda got the idea. Its really no big deal, I was just messing with you.

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Progress is a bit slow as always... Got the scarf joints done and the truss rod channels cut though. Hope to get the fingerboards on by the end of the week. Really need to get the body ready for casting... that means completely finished. I have to take it somewhere to get the sandblasting done as the sand blaster at school isnt equipped for wood. It would probably eat a gaping hole into the face! still have to drill some holes and finish sand before then.

p_00143.jpg

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100_5374.jpg

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Got a lot done on this one today! Firstly I drilled the TR access holes in the cores and rough cut one of them out on the band saw.

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After cleaning up the sides and the neck profile using the table router and my template, I took a spindle sander to the HS.

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A quick round over along the bottom edge of the core, and viola! A Guitar! The radius isnt quite right and needs a little hand finesse to get it to fit flush into the body cavity. But its not too bad.

p_00154.jpg

Its a pretty snug fit, so Ill have to sand back a bit to compensate for the finish inside the body cavity.

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