Jump to content

Gluing Broken Headstock Back On?


Jemram
 Share

Recommended Posts

Ouch. That is a really nasty break.

I think you have very little chance of getting a repair to work unless you do some pretty elaborate reinforcement. I'd probably opt for a new headstock, scarfed onto the neck so you have a decent amount of gluing area. Not a repair for a beginner, sorry :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

definately one of the most difficult kind of breaks to repair. i'm with setch - scarf a new headstock... or get a professional to do it anyway!!

The method in brians tutorial will not restore any strength to a break like this and to be honest, i think the one in that tutorial was on the verge of being unsuitable for the repair he did. Yours is definately unsuitable for that method

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ouch. That is a really nasty break.

I think you have very little chance of getting a repair to work unless you do some pretty elaborate reinforcement. I'd probably opt for a new headstock, scarfed onto the neck so you have a decent amount of gluing area. Not a repair for a beginner, sorry :D

I agree that's a NASTY break and NO epoxy wont help. Remove the fretboard and scarf joint on a new headstock and add a new fretboard.

Just my .02 cents worth

MK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The trouble is having a new headstock scarf jointed on would cost more than replacing the guitar, so I may as well scrap it :D

If your going to scrap it why not give it a go? These forums are always here and we usually try our best to guide someone through the task at hand and answer any reasonable questions asked.

Whoa, long sentence.

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If your going to scrap it why not give it a go? These forums are always here and we usually try our best to guide someone through the task at hand and answer any reasonable questions asked.

Whoa, long sentence.

:D

I don't have the tools to scarf joint a new head on, so it's going to have to be a case of giving wood glue and a ratchet strap to apply some pressure to the joint while it dries as go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As soon as I saw the break I said Ouch then scrolled down and notice that Setch said the same thing.

As the others have said that is the worse type of break you can have. The reason for this is there is very little surface area. The more surface area the stronger the bond. A strung guitar has around 60kg of pressure on it so the joints need to be strong.

If it was me having a go as there is nothing to lose if it doesn't work I would

Firstly glue the neck back together leave for a few days. Test the joint by trying to re-break itby using your hands only. If it breaks simply re- glue as the first attempt the glue didn't get into all the nooks and crannies. Then router out two rebates either side of the neck and extending say 3 " one side of the break and straight through the head stock.

In order to get nice rebates you will have to clamp the neck to a piece of flat timber (4 x 2 for eg) to provide a good base for the router

This would mean that you have 2 gluing surfaces per side.The neck where the 2 pieces have been glued on would have to be shaped as well as the headstock area tiedied up

If you're going to chuck it may as well give it a try.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ouch. That is a really nasty break.

I think you have very little chance of getting a repair to work unless you do some pretty elaborate reinforcement. I'd probably opt for a new headstock, scarfed onto the neck so you have a decent amount of gluing area. Not a repair for a beginner, sorry :D

+1 on the scarfed headstock repair.

I wonder how such a break could happen though. Its not even along the grain, which is usually how headstocks break.

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The pictures dont seem to so it clearly but there is alot of 'splinters' of wood about half an inch long on each piece which mesh nicely together, so the surface area should be quite large. It's got to be worth a shot.

To clarify, there will be a lot of surface area (tons infact, with the splitnered mess!) but there are not many long, side grain glueing surfaces. It's also going to be very difficult to get the joint clamped well in the direction which matters - you want the sidegrain areas to be snugged tight against each other.

It's definately worth trying a glue up as ashown in Brian's tutorial, but I wouldn't be at all surprised if it goes off like a mousetrap the first time you tune it up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys,

I've been thinking about ways to make the joint stronger using two dowels where the red dots are. I could use wooden dowels and drill holes the correct size for them and then use wood glue. The other option would be to use 5mm threaded steel bar in a 6mm holes and epoxy to hold everything together.

Any thoughts? I know it's a bodge but if I can get it to work it will make a handy pratice guitar.

IMG_4876edit.jpg

Edited by Jemram
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys,

I've been thinking about ways to make the joint stronger using two dowels where the red dots are. I could use wooden dowels and drill holes the correct size for them and then use wood glue. The other option would be to use 5mm threaded steel bar in a 6mm holes and epoxy to hold everything together.

Any thoughts? I know it's a bodge but if I can get it to work it will make a handy pratice guitar.

IMG_4876edit.jpg

I've tried simillar ways to this and unless you have got a jig thats set up perfectly for both ends it won't work

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i dont like the dowel idea because i think it will be very hard to do acuratley. The splint idea is better - just not sure those ones shown above would be sufficient for this break and the square ends of them would be harder to hide

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would say try and reapir it by just gluing end to end first. Since this is on a cheap guitar, it can't really hurt too much to try first. If it works, great, if not, nothing is lost. If it doesn't work I would get some cheap hardwoods and practice making some scarf joints by hand and once you are comfortable making them, try repairing this with a scarf joint.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...