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Is "new router bit day" a thing yet? The one on the left is my Ø11mm cutter on an 8mm shank that's seen too many days of being ridden hard and put away wet. She still does a great job, but that bearing is becoming a bit worn and needs constant cleaning/lubrication since it isn't sealed. That mighty Ø12mm shank on the Ø19,1mm diameter milling bit is going to need a new collet though. It isn't even going to touch the sides of the 1/2" collet that came with the Makita. It wouldn't even be fun watching it try. 🙀

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...also, R5 roundover so I'm good for most of the major sizes. Hopefully now that I have a router table on the horizon, an R2 roundover bit should become more usable.

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Protip: If you're working in Windows on a full size keyboard, hold down ALT and type 0216 on the number pad to get Ø.

Also in this twelve CD set, classics such as the unforgettable ALT+0176 (°), ALT+0178 (²), ALT+0179 (³) and many many more.

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I should print a note about those. Then again, "merkistö" (whatever that thingy is called in English) does the job pretty nicely most of the times. The German ß would sometimes be nice but my relatives understand a double s as a substitute.

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4 hours ago, Prostheta said:

Aww yiss.

One of these jobs will take ten minutes, the other will be a weekend job I think.

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Wot's in the glass? Looks like an IPA glass.....

SR

3 hours ago, Bizman62 said:

I should print a note about those. Then again, "merkistö" (whatever that thingy is called in English) does the job pretty nicely most of the times. The German ß would sometimes be nice but my relatives understand a double s as a substitute.

Character map. I'm old school so I tend to remember these pretty easily. I guess growing up knowing the ASCII set meant something after all!

Edited by Prostheta
Oops, managed to tick too many checkboxes and hit mod functions.
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1 hour ago, ScottR said:

Looks like an IPA glass.....

Most certainly is. Alcohol in Finland is so freaking expensive that even beer glasses only measure mere centiliters.

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1 hour ago, ScottR said:

Wot's in the glass? Looks like an IPA glass.....

SR

Talisker 10yo in a Glencairn glass. Nina complained about it being cold today in spite of it being 19°C during the day. The rain and general wet air kicks arthritis in the balls somewhat. After picking up the router lift, Nina insisted that we have a whisky before sauna. As usual, I decline to complain for fear of upsetting life's minor balances. This is fine.

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1 minute ago, Prostheta said:

Talisker 10yo in a Glencairn glass. Nina complained about it being cold today in spite of it being 19°C during the day. The rain and general wet air kicks arthritis in the balls somewhat. After picking up the router lift, Nina insisted that we have a whisky before sauna. As usual, I decline to complain for fear of upsetting life's minor balances. This is fine.

@Prostheta ,happy wife.... happy life. It might have been tough, but compromise can be a good thing.  :)

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10 minutes ago, ScottR said:

Good woman you've got there.

SR

You're damn right. When it's both the opposites of special and simple at the same time, that's the balance. However, I believe Nina snores louder than I do, but I can't quite verify this. She was of course interested in the starter pin on the router lift. Because you have to be.

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I think that the 50mm lens reduced to 35mm, coupled with the distance needed to get things in frame skewed the size of things. The router lift plate is something like 298 x 235,5mm. Just under 12" by just over 9-1/4". Once the router is in there, the weight is finger breaking good. I'm sure that I'll keep those spare digits out of the pinch zone when mounting it into the table!

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The next piece in this puzzle is how to rout a port with a shallow rebate in the MDF top. The rebate must have R20 corners to match the router lift's plate and a depth of at least 10mm, preferably 10-11mm so the adjuster screws haven't got a lot of work to do.

I'm going to have to end up making a template in plywood. Four low/narrow pieces of plywood DSTed to the template sheet all meeting end to side from around the lift itself will work. Once those four pieces are in place, the corners need knocking out with a Ø40mm Forstner bit. Aligning this into the corners and knocking in the point with a hammer before drilling is probably the best way. The other alternative would be using the 38mm drum on the spindle sander to work into the corners but I'm unsure whether this will be too tight for the corner radius....I'll have to take calipers to the drum itself with paper loaded. Having two options will help my head work on it today whilst stripping wallpaper....

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My Ø38mm sanding drum does in fact turn out to be a hair over Ø40mm when it has sandpaper fitted. That's absolutely perfect.

So the objective is to trace a rough outline on a sheet of plywood, knock out a few holes larger than Ø40mm near each corner so the spindle can fit through, run a single layer of tape around the plate to ease the fit slightly, tape plywood strips around to make the "negative" space for the template, sand the corners out to meet the plywood strips, then rout the straight edges till the waste can be removed. If this isn't self-explanatory, photos will help illustrate once I do this.

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So in principle, this. The four straight-edged pieces of plywood bounding the router lift plate are set in an anti-clockwise edge-to-end manner. Even though these pieces are cleanly cut from a table saw and hence mate perfectly, they don't really need to thanks to the internal corner radius.

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The first job is to knock out a hole in each corner. The largest Forstner bit I have on hand (read: "can find") is Ø35mm. Four of these plus a bit of chiselling to knock off the points....

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....to get the Ø38mm drum through.

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I did a shallow pass with a crappy bit that was something like Ø12-14mm, staying shy of the corners. I then realised that I could use my longer Ø8mm bit and not have to worry about that. This was LOUD and hurt my ears. I really should have worn ear defenders....

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Once cut to about a mm from the lower face, I sawed out the waste.

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....then cleaned up the internal edges with a bottom bearing template copy bit. The corners need a little cleanup with sandpaper or a file.

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Around the perimeter of the router plate are ten grub screws used to set the plate flush with the table surface. The plate is 9,65mm thick, so I think a recess of 12mm should be perfect. Where each height setting screw sits, I'll be fitting some sort of metal thing (not decided what thing to use yet, hence "thing") so the MDF doesn't compress under the weight of the lift over time.

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Template DST'ed to the top, around a 35mm wide channel sunk into the perimeter of the plate mounting port. After this, I pulled the template and drilled dozens of holes around the central waste part before cutting it free.

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very nice looking table!

great result with the iron-on band on the table top. 

On 8/23/2020 at 5:05 PM, Prostheta said:

Making things to make other things is part of the joy.

timeconsuming, but indeed joy! 

 

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Oh, totally. This is a very transactional bit of work though; I have a lot of work around our new home that will benefit from a router table, such as picture rails, skirting boards, door frames/thresholds, new kitchen cabinet doors, etc. Compared to buying these things ready-made (which isn't practical when designed custom anyway) the cost and time spent building a well-made machining station pays for itself very quickly. A good router table should be a money printer, especially when it comes to predictably accurate and safe work. There's so many reasons on top of that, but this is a start!

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Alright. We're getting there.

The top drops in perfectly, and I've just realised that I haven't even tightened the "snugger" cam locks (silver hex bolts, one left and two top). Levelling the plate was a bit of an adventure. As mentioned, the MDF is soft so I drilled ten 3mm deep, 9mm diameter holes at each levelling screw position, then drilled them through at 4mm. Ten A4 steel hex head machine bolts with flat smooth heads went into each of these with a little cyanoacrylate glue to provide a solid and durable surface for the levelling bolts to seat on.

To level the plate, I brought all the screws up and went around the plate anti-clockwise, sinking each leveller down until it contacted and starts to raise the plate before moving onto the next. Once we're around the plate (twice) the levellers are within a half turn or so of their bolts. The plate was roughly levelled using the top and lower outermost screws and checked for rocking. Here it becomes a case of bringing down the rest of the levellers and doing slight quarter turn adjustments here and there. Once pretty much dead on, the four big corner bolts lock the plate to the table, and another round of checks and adjustments are made. I think it took five minutes or so to get it dead on. I'm very happy with it, and we'll see how it routs.

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The upper surface of the table frame was insulated with adhesive cellular foam rubber, both to decouple machine vibrations from the frame and to provide air sealing for the vacuum. A port will go at the bottom of the cavity, and I'll experiment a little with chip management baffles or whatever. The joints around the frame will get a nice bead of silicone caulk as additional sealing, although I'm sure it's already pretty much perfect. A possible option will be to add car sound insulation to the inner walls to reduce the echoey-ness of the machine cavity. This is beast of a router and anything that improves the noise factor is a bonus.

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