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Norris

First Build - The "Nozcaster"

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Polish, polish, polish

So I've stopped procrastinating, bought myself a bottle of Meguiars Ultimate Compound and got busy with the elbow grease. I think I may be some time, but can give you a sneaky preview of the lower horn :)

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Ooh - I should have dusted that a bit better!

That's turned out rather nice - I've just got the rest of the body & neck to go!

Edited by Norris

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Brilliant!

You are a very patient and meticulous fellow....whom will end up with a glorious first build.

SR

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It is! Meguiars compounds and waxes are fantastic on guitars the same as they are on show cars.

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Thanks folks!

After about another 6 hours of polishing the front is done (although there are a couple of spots that could maybe be a bit shinier :D) I won't post any more photos now until the final reveal - unless of course I get tempted to post another detail shot :D

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12 hours ago, Prostheta said:

Process photos are valuable also!

Ha ha. Put a dab of compound on a clean cloth (I used an old 100% cotton T-shirt), then rub it in small overlapping circles, over & over again. When the solvent dries off a bit, wipe the residue away with a clean microfibre cloth. Repeat many times, working on a small area until it's shiny before moving onto the next. The super-specs (see avatar) are very useful, as is having light coming from one side, preferably ambient daylight

I can take some photos if you want... :D

Edit: To give some sort of clue as to duration, the whole top took about 7 hours to do

Edited by Norris
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On 7/3/2017 at 3:02 AM, Norris said:

Thanks folks!

After about another 6 hours of polishing the front is done (although there are a couple of spots that could maybe be a bit shinier :D) I won't post any more photos now until the final reveal - unless of course I get tempted to post another detail shot :D

You are going to hate trying to photograph that. It'll be like trying to take pictures of a mirror.

SR

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12 hours ago, ScottR said:

You are going to hate trying to photograph that. It'll be like trying to take pictures of a mirror.

SR

14 hours ago, meatloaf said:

I'm not sure I can wait for the final reveal, How about some more photo's, after all we like photo's, lots of photo's

Patience, young padawan (says Norris the novice!) <_<

I nearly took a photo of the lower horn detail on the back - but managed to resist! :wOOt

 

About 5 hours spent on the back last night. There has been a little bit of sinking of the grain filler & lacquer. That's cool though - that's the nature of ash, and it's just expressing its personality. It'll probably get covered in buckle rash on the first use anyway!

On to the sides, plus another detail pass over the top & back, then start on the neck...

And at some point I've got to press the rear ferrules into place - that's my next cloud on the horizon, I hope it's a white fluffy one!

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5 hours ago, Norris said:

And at some point I've got to press the rear ferrules into place - that's my next cloud on the horizon, I hope it's a white fluffy one!

Here's a tip I got from @Drak.  Heat up your soldering iron and press the tip into the ferrules and press them into place that way. That will soften up the lacquer on the edge of the holes and keep it from chipping when you push it in. Chipped lacquer will piss you off.... ask me how I know.

SR

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18 hours ago, ScottR said:

Here's a tip I got from @Drak.  Heat up your soldering iron and press the tip into the ferrules and press them into place that way. That will soften up the lacquer on the edge of the holes and keep it from chipping when you push it in. Chipped lacquer will piss you off.... ask me how I know.

SR

Ooh - thanks! :)

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I'm just teasing you now :D

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That's the body polished up. I'll check it over to make sure I got it all - it was getting a bit dark at 11pm when I finished last night :)

Again, I really ought to dust it before taking photos :D

Edited by Norris
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2 hours ago, Norris said:

I'm just teasing you now :D

I thought we dispensed with the 'Are You Being Served' references ages ago? ;)

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I'm still working on this, but despite the body being about ready I've taken a bit of a backwards step on the neck. Having lacquered it to death, I then scraped the lacquer off the frets - forgetting to score it first. That lead to a fair bit of chipping, which is now being fixed by touching up with the wife's trusty fine watercolour brush and scraping back with a cut down razor blade...

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In another backwards step, I'd got the headstock lovely and smooth, then used a soldering iron to push in the ferrules...

20170807_200517.thumb.jpg.6e71963f2d5ad4fb2dfe6ead349240b5.jpg

... which will also be scraped back and touched up.

Gah! :blink:

In better news I've started wiring up the controls, which has gone a lot better

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1 hour ago, Norris said:

I'm still working on this, but despite the body being about ready I've taken a bit of a backwards step on the neck. Having lacquered it to death, I then scraped the lacquer off the frets - forgetting to score it first. That lead to a fair bit of chipping, which is now being fixed by touching up with the wife's trusty fine watercolour brush and scraping back with a cut down razor blade...

20170807_194352.thumb.jpg.b065c6fce54407e9a2cf5ef807c180d3.jpg

In another backwards step, I'd got the headstock lovely and smooth, then used a soldering iron to push in the ferrules...

20170807_200517.thumb.jpg.6e71963f2d5ad4fb2dfe6ead349240b5.jpg

... which will also be scraped back and touched up.

Gah! :blink:

In better news I've started wiring up the controls, which has gone a lot better

Oooooooh :(

I know this sort of thing is part of the 'total experience' but it's a bummer when it happens...it's like having to go back home when you're a few miles on the way to a holiday destination because you've forgotten to put the bins out....

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1 hour ago, Andyjr1515 said:

then used a soldering iron to push in the ferrules...

Bummer. I should have warned you about getting them too hot....

SR

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2 hours ago, ScottR said:

Bummer. I should have warned you about getting them too hot....

SR

I think my soldering iron might need calibrating anyway. At least it doesn't seem to have touched the underlying dye - everything else can be fixed.

The good news is they won't be coming out again and the (Kluson) tuners line up nicely

Edit: I posted the pictures mainly as a cautionary tale for others, but also to show how it can be fixed. The picture of the fret chips is after I spent an evening touching up, then scraped back the following evening. Having applied another touch-up layer last night they are looking a lot better already

Edit #2: And the easiest way I found to cut the razor blade down was using my Dremel with a cutting disk :)

Edited by Norris

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Funnily enough I did think about sanding a chamfer at the top of the ferrule holes before trying to insert them, but couldn't find anything suitable. Initial attempts with a countersink bit just looked like it was going to chip the lacquer. Something like a countersink, but grit-based, would be a very useful tool for that kind of thing

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bummer about the set backs- but the good news is you will remember it next time! :thumb: and your repair skills have some experience in the bag now too!

I feel your pain on those frets- as I did the exact same thing many moons ago trying to fix up a pawn shop find cheapo import strat. It did not fair well. Its pretty bad when the guitar ends up in worse shape than when you bought it to fix it up. 

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