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Cutting Bodies With Jigsaw


Schappy
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I did that once, on my first build. It's definitely wasn't fun. I was cutting through African mahogany that was almost 3" thick :D

There's no reason it can't done though. You'll probably have to do a lot of adjustments afterwards, so make sure you leave enough space.

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Yeah, that one inch is pretty extreme. If the saw is that bad, maybe drill a crapload of holes all around with a drill press. Give that saw blade some "guidance".

I have a real jem of a jigsaw that needs help like that. 1950's or '60's Craftsman deal. Real special saw this one is. Apparently it must have some special circuitry in it that makes it behave as if someone really stoned is using it.

I know what I need to do. I need to contact the Smithsonian and see if they're interested in such a special saw. I'll email them now.

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I'm definitely of the school that says you can use a jig-saw for a rough cut only. Then I switch to using a template, a router and bearing bit. I had to learn this the hard way.

I usually leave at least 5 mm around the outline, because the blade can drift pretty far.

But really, the jigsaw ends up being more work than it's worth. I've since found a couple of people willing to let me use their bandsaws.

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Anyone else out there have the Bosch 1590?

It has an optional precision control system where two guides are in place next to the blade to prevent blade run out.

Should I use this?

What speed should I run the saw?

What type of blade should I use?

The jigsaw also has a blade orbit selector depending on what your cutting.

There is a setting for scrolling work and one for cutting hardwood.

Which setting do I use?

Im new to all of this and appreciate all of your help.

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Yeah, that one inch is pretty extreme. If the saw is that bad, maybe drill a crapload of holes all around with a drill press. Give that saw blade some "guidance".

This definitely works. The closer the wholes are to each other, the less drifting you'll have. It makes it a lot easier in general. You use the jigsaw for less time, which means your hand won't go numb from the vibration.

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The couple of times I used a jigsaw, I made relief cuts, going from the outside of the blank to just shy of the body line in the tight areas. (I also used a heavy duty, thick blade to make these cuts faster, and took off big chunks where convenient.) It was easier than making a bunch of holes, and the wedges of wood just fell off as I made the cuts, letting the back of the blade stay clear so the whole thing turned easier.

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I used two blades for a test on my bass. I used an agressive blade which came with the jigsaw, and that cut pretty fast but had a lot of gnarled edges. When you're trying to get rid of a checking area, that's not the best thing.

I will always use a fine toothed blade on mine from now on. It may take a really long time, but i'm happy with the results in the end, and it makes sanding SO much easier.

I have a Black & Decker jigsaw with variable speed, and they're made by the same company. On harder woods use a slower speed, and on soft things (particle board for example) use a faster setting. You'll burn your wood if you go too fast, and you'll tear out if you go too slow. practice on some scrap wood of the same kind if you have any.

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One thing that's particularly applicable to jigsaws and curved cuts, although I find it true of most saws, even handsaws, is to let the blade due the work. You can try and push a jigsaw through faster, and you might even get it through faster, your cut is going to suffer.

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One thing that's particularly applicable to jigsaws and curved cuts, although I find it true of most saws, even handsaws, is to let the blade due the work. You can try and push a jigsaw through faster, and you might even get it through faster, your cut is going to suffer.

Thats a great point J and it also makes it much more apparent to whether or not your saw is up to the task and how suited the blade is as well. If the only way you can get a cut is by force then something is wrong. I think the oscillating feature on jigsaws now will go a long way to increase the saws ability, especially for things like rough cutting a blank and the like.

Edited by jmrentis
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