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You are one of my favorite builders on here, this guitar should give everyone a reason why.

Thanks man! That really does mean alot! (still waiting for that neck picture on your build ;cough; ;cough;) :P

Thanks for the other feedback as well guys, Im really glad to hear you like it!

Welp, Im still not the best painter so Im not gonna spray comissioned builds just yet but my dad thinks hes up for it so Im giving him a test. I have a scrap body that I will give to him along with materials and a paint schedual. If he can give me the glass finish im looking for and the customer approves, Ill have him shoot and buff this one for me. Hes been In the automotive repair business for his whole life and knows how to lay some clear so Im confident he will impress me. In the mean time Ill keep practicing on builds I make for stock.

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I was scrolling through your finishing pictures saying to myself, "meh" . . . . ."eh" . . . . ."meh" . . . . .then I saw that last pic and went Ooooh!

Bold choice you made there. It came out beautiful. Nicely done and looking forward to seeing this one all polished up.

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The only thing I would do differently is not dye with black first....and this goes for all figured maple tops as well. Add black to whatever your main top color is to create a very dark version of that---dark blue, deep dark red, dark green--use mohogany to create dark browns for tobacco or orange. Use those for your deep dark sandback colors instead of straight black. This will give just as much pop, but the color will be cleaner with smoother transitions than the straight black will. Straight black tends to create a slightly muddier color in comparison.

SR

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Better tell PRS, Suhr, EBMM, Tom Anderson, and Mcnaught they are doing it wrong too then....

Tylers work speaks for itself in my opinion.

The only thing I would do differently is not dye with black first....and this goes for all figured maple tops as well. Add black to whatever your main top color is to create a very dark version of that---dark blue, deep dark red, dark green--use mohogany to create dark browns for tobacco or orange. Use those for your deep dark sandback colors instead of straight black. This will give just as much pop, but the color will be cleaner with smoother transitions than the straight black will. Straight black tends to create a slightly muddier color in comparison.

SR

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Better tell PRS, Suhr, EBMM, Tom Anderson, and Mcnaught they are doing it wrong too then....

Tylers work speaks for itself in my opinion.

Better tell PRS, Suhr, EBMM, Tom Anderson, and Mcnaught they are doing it wrong too then....

Tylers work speaks for itself in my opinion.

The only thing I would do differently is not dye with black first....and this goes for all figured maple tops as well. Add black to whatever your main top color is to create a very dark version of that---dark blue, deep dark red, dark green--use mohogany to create dark browns for tobacco or orange. Use those for your deep dark sandback colors instead of straight black. This will give just as much pop, but the color will be cleaner with smoother transitions than the straight black will. Straight black tends to create a slightly muddier color in comparison.

SR

Whether you agree with it or not, it is true. Black can kill the grain instead of make it pop most of the time. If you look at the difference between woods dyed black first, and woods dyed with a darker color first, the ones dyed with a darker matching color are much deeper and more 3d. Black first just gives it contrast and kills the figure.

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Im not speaking from my knowledge base. Ive made some ugly maple with black dye before. PRS uses black quite a bit, obviously not for lighter colors. Black base on amber would look dumb lol. For deep reds, purples, blues, etc, black is great if done well. Ive tried the "darker color" before, i wasnt a fan, but its all subjective anyway.

Better tell PRS, Suhr, EBMM, Tom Anderson, and Mcnaught they are doing it wrong too then....

Tylers work speaks for itself in my opinion.

Better tell PRS, Suhr, EBMM, Tom Anderson, and Mcnaught they are doing it wrong too then....

Tylers work speaks for itself in my opinion.

The only thing I would do differently is not dye with black first....and this goes for all figured maple tops as well. Add black to whatever your main top color is to create a very dark version of that---dark blue, deep dark red, dark green--use mohogany to create dark browns for tobacco or orange. Use those for your deep dark sandback colors instead of straight black. This will give just as much pop, but the color will be cleaner with smoother transitions than the straight black will. Straight black tends to create a slightly muddier color in comparison.

SR

Whether you agree with it or not, it is true. Black can kill the grain instead of make it pop most of the time. If you look at the difference between woods dyed black first, and woods dyed with a darker color first, the ones dyed with a darker matching color are much deeper and more 3d. Black first just gives it contrast and kills the figure.

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Might also be incumbent on dye type and technique as well. I know for a fact, top end luthiers use black frequently. Obviously, color choice is a huge factor here as well.

That is interesting. Because almost all the top end luthiers i know of use brown or a darker color of the top coat.

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Like i said, go tell prs, ebmm, etc etc they are doing it wrong....

Not really up for discussion, and we dont need to make this a pissing contest. Black works when done right, theres no argument here. If you do a crap job, or you dont do it right, then your end result reflects that. Tylers work speaks for itself.

Might also be incumbent on dye type and technique as well. I know for a fact, top end luthiers use black frequently. Obviously, color choice is a huge factor here as well.

That is interesting. Because almost all the top end luthiers i know of use brown or a darker color of the top coat.
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I did not intend to say that Tyler's work was not awesome.....in fact I said it was in an earlier post. I just wanted to suggest a way to improve on it....subtly in this case.

Black works and has been used for as long as figured maple has been popped. What I am saying is to tint the black in the direction of the main color of the top. It is just as dark, but it blends better.

When I was in college many many years ago, I took amny paintin classes. We used something called Payne's gray to darken colors instead of black. It was pretty much a dark navy blue and it darkened colors much more cleanly than black.

What I am recomending follows those same rules. There can be many shades of black. Make and use the one that goes best with your intended color.

SR

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Thats fair, i dont disagree even a little bit. I simply read as "black is wrong, dont use" (the joys of textual context and syntax) which raised some flags in my mind lol. I find with some figures, when i used black it came out "dirty" looking and was a nightmare to sand off. Never had an issue with tops though.

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The only thing I would do differently is not dye with black first....and this goes for all figured maple tops as well. Add black to whatever your main top color is to create a very dark version of that---dark blue, deep dark red, dark green--use mohogany to create dark browns for tobacco or orange. Use those for your deep dark sandback colors instead of straight black. This will give just as much pop, but the color will be cleaner with smoother transitions than the straight black will. Straight black tends to create a slightly muddier color in comparison.

SR

I know whatcha mean Scott, I provided the customer with a test of both options and he chose the black under coat so thats the one we went with. Different stokes as they say.

Waiting on the finish process at the moment so in the mean time I started looking at up wiring diagrams Ill need for this build. Ill be doing a vol/pushpull-tone/ 3way toggle and this diagram seems to be what I need

http://www.guitarelectronics.com/product/WD2HH3T11_01/Guitar-Wiring-Diagram-2-Humbuckers3-Way-Toggle-Switch1-Volume0Tone001.html#reviews

The only thing I am unsure of is when I split the coils, which ones will be active. The customer would like the screw bobbins to be the active ones when the push pull is engaged but Im not sure if that is what I will get from this diagram. Could someone confirm this or point me in the right direction?

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The guitar has been sprayed! Now I'm just waiting a bit for the finish to cure. Rather then try and take a bunch of pics and use the standard line "Its so much better in person" I figured an HD video would do it more justice. It is from my phone though so please bare with the stupid skinny layout its playing in.

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That is fantastic

Looks like airbrushed true fire!

Thanks! I have enough redwood for a whole nother one peice top, Im trying to decide what colors to try with it next. Open to suggestions

That one of those trapazoidal neck profiles? Did I miss that in the thread?

Chris

yes it is! It feels great too. I was skeptical but I ended up really like it!

Beautiful work Ty. Very Impressive!

Thanks bud! :)

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It really is georgeous Tyler. Nice pics too. That is often harder than building the dang guitar! Could you tell if the bridge influenced the sound at all.........well of couse it did, but does it sound any different from what a bridge normally sounds?

SR

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